ABLE Assembly: Arts Better the Lives of Everyone 2021 | Theme: Intersectionality, Disability, and Arts Education ABLE Assembly: Arts Better the Lives of Everyone 2021 | Theme: Intersectionality, Disability, and Arts Education

Pre-recorded 20 Minute Session

Saturday, April 10, 2021

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Pre-recorded 20 Minute Session: Act for Advocacy
Wendy Duke
Wendy Duke
The Center for Applied Drama and Autism | Theatre on the Spectrum, Co-Founder | Program Director

“Act for Advocacy” is an applied drama workshop to help people learn to advocate for themselves and others. Drama games and exercises provide a useful way for people of all abilities to learn the skills they need to assert their rights and the rights of those around them. This workshop provides a safe and judgment-free space to share experiences of discrimination. Act for Advocacy empowers participants, by acting out real-life scenarios using improv and Theatre of the Oppressed techniques. Injustice can take many forms from landlords ignoring tenants' rights, to someone deliberating damaging a student's artwork, or an individual is made to feel that they have no talents or gifts to share with the world at large. Until these issues are uncovered and addressed, arts learning and quality of life will be hindered. In this hands-on workshop, audience members will be invited to "act for advocacy" with our company.

Looking to dive deeper into the content of the session? Check out these supporting materials:

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Pre-recorded 20 Minute Session: At the Intersection of Culturally Responsive Teaching and Universal Design
Celia Watson
Celia Watson
Boston Ballet, Community Education Coordinator
Alicia Greene
Alicia Greene
Boston Ballet, Assistant Program Director

Using the framework of Boston Ballet’s Adaptive Dance Program and Education and Community Initiatives, we will explore how the practices of Culturally Responsive Teaching and Universal Design intersect to create an inclusive dance experience. We will examine the definition of culture, and how each of us can examine our own cultural lens and build awareness of broader social contexts. We will then connect these strategies to universal design, and explore through program design and instruction how to provide multiple means of representation, expression, and engagement to all abilities and cultures.


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Pre-recorded 20 Minute Session: Engaging Teens In Conversations of Race and Disability Through Theatre: Developing an Action Plan for your High School Drama Club or Local Youth Theater Company
Tara Mansour
Tara Mansour
Westwood Public Schools, Occupational Therapist

Are you involved with youth theatre? Do you want to develop a student culture that embraces anti-racism, anti-ableism and anti-oppression? This presentation will support youth leaders to develop a multisensory approach for teens to address social inequalities through the performing arts. Theatre provides a platform to tell stories that challenge convention, spark conversation, provoke thoughts and spotlight the emotions is us all. Nicholas Hartlep discusses the power of storytelling and its powerful and persuasive ability to unlearn beliefs that are commonly believed to be true (2009). In this session, we use performance art as a means to engage young minds in discussion and provide strategies for exploring the layers of subordination that exist based on gender, class, race, disability, immigration status and other social identities. Where can you begin? Join us on the journey of bringing the conversation about intersectionality and injustice to your local drama club or youth theatre program.

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Additional Resources

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Pre-recorded 20 Minute Session: Teaching is Activism! Implementing the Arts as Catalyst to Accessing a Deeper Understanding of Equity and Our Universal Interconnectedness
Adam Goldberg
Adam Goldberg
NYC Schools PS-177, Music Teacher and Apple Distinguished Educator

Please allow me to share my journey through a year of uncertainty and how the ever-present power of music led my students and I to revelation and celebration!

The upheavals of this year created opportunities for my students and I to find deeper meaning. Teaching homeroom remotely, I found ways to connect my lessons with common themes through music; addressing today’s most critical social issues in accessible and relatable ways.

Using musical and video examples in class, the Arts, Science, ELA, History and Social/Emotional Learning unified to bring a deeper understanding of the devastating human actions causing climate change disasters. A culminating video will be shown illustrating how music served as the catalyst to student learning.

Our clss is now exploring the Monarch butterfly and its deep connections to Mexican Culture, History, Science, and climate change. More music will be introduced as well. Further projects related to the recent and ongoing protests for social justice will also be implemented.

 This school year, through its many trials, has brought so much opportunity for personal learning and growth. What’s around the corner? I don’t know! But I’m looking forward to the opportunity to share my learning with you!

Note: If unable to view video due to YouTube restrictions, use this link for alternate viewing method: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1l2N6RylF6twgPd3lgMNFzBCHJaNSikuz/view?usp=sharing


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Additional Resources

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Pre-recorded 20 Minute Session: When They See Us : Intersectionality and Ableism in Special Education
Aliza Greenberg
Aliza Greenberg
Learning Spring School, Arts Enrichment Coordinator
Alyssa Liles-Amponsah
Alyssa Liles-Amponsah
Temple University, Associate Director of Diversity Initiatives and Community Engagement

This session will engage participants in discussion around the intersections of ableism and racism in special education. Using Talila A. Lewis’ definition of ableism we will explore the ways in which the arts and special education might devalue disabled students of color through systemic issues and how we, as individual educators, can work to break down those systems.  By recognizing and celebrating the intersectional identities of all students we move the needle towards more thoughtful and culturally relevant teaching. Led by social justice educators focused on race and disability, the session will explore how ableism and racism work against students with disabilities in our education system, and then offer action steps that arts educators can take in their teaching practice, curriculum creation, interaction with students, and advocacy to begin to break down these systems and operate within a justice centered framework.

Looking to dive deeper into the content of the session? Check out these supporting materials:

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Pre-recorded 20-minute Session: A DisCrit Perspective on Music Education: Considerations for Intersectional Change
Erika Knapp
Erika Knapp
Michigan State University

The way teachers engage with dis/ability and race in their classrooms is often linked to their underlying belief systems and substantial evidence connects teacher beliefs and perceptions to the reification of hegemonic norms (Annamma, 2015b; Heroux, 2013). One contributing factor is a systemic cultural incongruence between teachers and students of color and those with dis/abilities, which solidifies deficit perspectives (De Matthews & Serafini, 2020). The majority of the teacher workforce is white and able-bodied and “lack prolonged, ongoing interaction with people of color and therefore develop misinformed, deficit social and cultural perspectives of racially, ethnically and linguistically diverse students” (Warren, 2015, p. 573). Music education is not immune to this and educators need to consider how they might be contributing to this problem.

DisCrit, or Dis/ability Critical Race Theory, is a theoretical framework that combines dis\ability studies and critical race theory to examine how “race and ability are socially co-constructed and interdependent” (Annamma, et al., p. 5). Using DisCrit as a framework, this session explores issues in music education such as pre-service teacher education, curriculum design, and instructional materials to suggest ways music education programs might make changes towards greater equity for students.

Looking to dive deeper into the content of the session? Check out these supporting materials:


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Pre-recorded 20-minute Session: Figure On Diversity: Benefits of Life Drawing and Representation in Arts Education
Angela DeCarlis
Angela DeCarlis
Figure on Diversity, Founder and Director

The artistic practices of Figure Modeling and Life Drawing each come with benefits, particularly regarding positive body perception. Models report attitudes which demonstrate their own "corporeal empowerment," and studies suggest that these advantages can be reaped second-hand, through the practice of drawing a model.

But who has access to these benefits? In Boston, the figure modeling community is comprised predominantly of white, cisgender, thin/athletic, and able-bodied models. This is a problem not only for art students who do not share physical affinity with models, but also in terms of representation more broadly. By limiting the bodies seen in artwork and in our students' education, we are reinforcing the harmful idea that only some bodies are aesthetically worthy of representation.

 Through workshops designed to increase figure modeling's accessibility to people belonging to marginalized demographics, we hope to expand the reach of modeling's benefits to everyone in the classroom, and beyond.

Looking to dive deeper into the content of the session? Check out these supporting materials:



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Pre-recorded 20-minute Session: The Importance of Anti-Ableist Perspectives in Preservice Art Education: Faculty and Student Perspectives
Jenna Gabriel
Jenna Gabriel
Virginia Commonwealth University, Arts in Education Consultant | Special Education Specialist
Anh Ha
Anh Ha
Virginia Commonwealth University, Preservice Teacher

This session, led by a VCU Art Education instructor and student, will explore the potential of an undergraduate course to develop anti-ableist mindsets and practices in preservice art teachers. The session will provide an overview of the syllabus, which draws on art education, special education, and critical disability studies works in addition to practical application exercises. Participants will learn how to apply a critical lens in examining and reimagining their own lessons from an anti-ableist perspective. Presenters will provide a brief history and critique of how students with learning disabilities are supported within the arts education landscape, as well as practical and anti-ableist strategies that may prove to be effective when working with students with ADHD. In addition to a discussion of future implications, instructional strategies for both preservice teachers and K-12 students will be provided--making this session useful to current faculty and practicing arts teachers alike.

Looking to dive deeper into the content of the session? Check out these supporting materials:

Additional Resources

Sunday, April 11, 2021

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Pre-recorded 20 Minute Session: Advancing Equity Through Reasonable Accommodation in Music Education
Sanna Kivijärvi
Sanna Kivijärvi
Sibelius Academy, University of the Arts Helsinki, Researcher and Educator
Pauli Rautiainen
Pauli Rautiainen
Tampere Unviersity, Associate Professor of Public Law

This presentation will address the matters of justified differential treatment in music education in relation to disability and the concept of reasonable accommodation that is formulated in the United Nations’ Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). CRPD approaches the social construction of disability from a politicised perspective and declares that refusing to make accommodations results in discrimination. From the perspective of teacher autonomy, this presentation focuses on two aspects of reasonable accommodation: (a) its definition and (b) its implications for music education practice. Responsibility for reasonable accommodation is considered through practical illustrations that address matters such as musical notation and instrument selection. The presentation is based on an article by Sanna Kivijärvi and Pauli Rautiainen (2020), ‘Contesting music education policies through the concept of reasonable accommodation: Teacher autonomy and equity enactment in Finnish music education’, published in the peer-reviewed journal Research Studies in Music Education.

Looking to dive deeper into the content of the session? Check out these supporting materials:

Additional Resources

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Pre-recorded 20 Minute Session: Art Heals
Nancy Shell
Nancy Shell
Temple University

Art as a spiritual and healing vehicle for the disabled.

Alphonse Mucha said,” Art only exists to communicate a spiritual message”. Art opens the door to communication of new hope from despair.   There is quite a bit of pain, depression and isolation invisible and visible disabled communities. The need for hope of a better outcome than the one I have currently had of isolation and despair.   Art comes as a healing balm to heal the wounds of life and disability. It creates out of that pain comes a passion fo connection and need   Many disabled people suffer from despair and isolation. Our discussion and presentation will illustrate our art as a healing personal journey and how this personal journey to heal ourselves from isolation and despair and manifested into art programs to serve other disabled people in the Philadelphia Community.

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Additional Resources

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Pre-recorded 20 Minute Session: Critical Disability Studies: Implications for Justice-Oriented Arts Education
Jenna Gabriel
Jenna Gabriel
Virginia Commonwealth University, Arts in Education Consultant | Special Education Specialist

This session will offer an introduction to critical disability studies and its practical implications for arts education. The presenter will distinguish between the medical, social, affirmative, and political/relational models of disability with a focus on what each might offer practicing arts teachers supporting students with disabilities in their classrooms. Participants will learn practical strategies to create environments that en-able rather than dis-able their students and explore considerations for the design of arts learning experiences that are accessible, inclusive, and just.

Looking to dive deeper into the content of the session? Check out these supporting materials:

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Pre-recorded 20 Minute Session: Disability Justice in University Theatre Programs
Carson Hebblethwaite
Carson Hebblethwaite
Research Fellow, Coastal Carolina University
Amanda Masterpaul
Amanda Masterpaul
Coastal Carolina University, Adjunct Professor

We believe that all voices are essential and highly imaginative. As such, our workshop will explore the intersections of theatre and disability justice through a collegiate program entitled Inclusive Theatre Group. Inclusive Theatre Group fosters a safe, non-judgmental ensemble in which disabled, able-bodied, and neurodivergent community members and Coastal Carolina University students tap into their creative voices through theatre. Inclusive Theatre Group builds community, nurtures creativity, and re-awakens a sense of play and fun in order to enhance collaboration, social & emotional wellness, and self-determining confidence. Our workshop will provide research, insights, and tools targeted towards university theatre programs in an effort to encourage how a disability-inclusive theatrical community within a university setting can support universal design and radical imagination. Distilling research from group interviews, storycircles, and play-making, we will share aspects of a toolkit, detailing disability-inclusive theatre as a modality for equitable opportunity, universal design, and communal well-being.

Looking to dive deeper into the content of the session? Check out these supporting materials:

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Pre-recorded 20 Minute Session: Disability Objectification in Media
Miles Wilcox
Miles Wilcox
Berklee Institute for Arts Education and Special Needs, Private Music Lessons & Early Childhood Teacher

 

The internet is saturated with viral media featuring disability; from video clips of a food service employee feeding a disabled customer, to the story of a high school electing a teen with Down syndrome being elected to prom court. This phenomenon is known as “inspiration p*rn,” a term coined by the late disability activist Stella Young. It refers to the objectification of people with disabilities in the media, which serves the purpose of making the consumers, namely people without disabilities, feel good inside. The message, either implicit or explicit, can range from, “If this disabled person can do XYZ, what’s your excuse?” to “Look how compassionate this able-bodied person is for offering basic human decency to this poor disabled soul.” It can imply that disabled people are to be pitied, portray an unrealistic view of disability, or that disability is simply a mindset. However well intentioned these stories may be, they cause harm to the disability community. This presentation will focus on how to identify objectification of disabled voices, how to center disabled voices in order to prevent perpetuating these problematic messages, and interrupt the systems of oppression towards the disability community.

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Additional Resources

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Pre-recorded 20 Minute Session: Legally Yours - The Child Find Mandate
Elise S. Sobol
Elise S. Sobol
New York University, Director of Music Education, Visiting Associate Professor

Presenter will discuss the Child Find Mandate as a basic right for every child to be enabled to receive a free: and appropriate public education which includes access to music and the arts as part of a well rounded education (ESSA, 2015).  Legally required in every State under Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA, 1990)  there is inequity of implementation and dissemination of information to parents and families preventing children across the nation from receiving early Intervention and other specialized services through elementary to secondary school settings. How do we get the information to the individuals who need it?   Legally yours - The Child Find Mandate is our inclusive right for your child’s successful life. Session is suitable for all caregivers, educators, administrators, parents,  family, and members of the professional services community.

Looking to dive deeper into the content of the session? Check out these supporting materials:

Additional Resources

- EDT
Pre-recorded 20 Minute Session: Parenthood – Choices, Vices and Arts Expressions in Being a Disabled Parent
Fran Flaherty
Fran Flaherty
Anthropology of Motherhood, Founder and Creator
Ruth Fabby
Ruth Fabby
Disability Arts Cymru, Director

Fran and Ruth: disabled artist-mothers have endured scrutiny, intrusion, judgement and criticism in adding to the population. Willing and equal the task of motherhood, Fran and Ruth’s stories of motherhood are full of unencouraging reprove. As artists, however, they suddenly realized, they’ve not made art about this.Fran and Ruth will discuss lack of representation of Deaf/disabled parents and its intersection with being a disabled artist. What happens to the narrative of disabled artist mothers in areas such as our reproductive rights, our freedom to choose birthing procedures? How can children of disabled artist-parents be supported? Fran and Ruth will share with you a dissertation on why we as disabled artist-mothers do not represent these issues in our work and how important is it for disabled mother-artists to make art about being a disabled parent? What can institutions, arts and cultural producers do to support disabled parent-artists careers?

Looking to dive deeper into the content of the session? Check out these supporting materials:

- EDT
Pre-recorded 20-minute Session: Coping with Hidden Identity: Creating Art to Address Workplace Isolation
Audrey Reeves
Audrey Reeves
Utah Valley University, Program Coordinator in the Art & Design Department

Teachers are expected to fit dominant narratives of the workplace, typically characterized as white, male, middle class, able, heterosexual, and Christian. Teachers who don’t share these values tend to remain closeted, left to resolve inner conflict on their own, in favor of peaceful communities. This comes at a tremendous personal cost, negatively impacting teacher engagement and well-being. Presenters will discuss personal narratives of isolation and conflict in the workplace due to non-privileged identity statuses such as being neurodiverse, female, and having different religious beliefs that the norm. The demonstrated artmaking exercise and micro-resistances can help teachers process, clarify, and understand the intersectionality of their identity in relationship to environments in which they work, empowering teachers to cope with conflicting feelings which arise in everyday encounters. Through experimental writing and journaling, participants will learn skills to address this internal conflict, enabling them to coexist within their work environments.

Looking to dive deeper into the content of the session? Check out these supporting materials:

Additional Resources