Pre-Recorded 20 Min Presentation

Saturday, April 9, 2022

- EDT
Arts-Based Education for All - Key to Success Model of Practice: Aruba (Dutch Caribbean)
Elise S. Sobol,  Ed.D
Elise S. Sobol, Ed.D
NYU Steinhardt, Director of Music Education (retired)


Filling a societal need for an education-to workplace opportunity for neurodiverse island youth (age 16-25) -our presentation will describe a strength based model utilizing five days of arts curriculum integrated with skill based classes to foster independence in the community. Presenters will outline the steps taken to build the school along with the mindset needed to break through the barriers of bias. Individual success stories will be shared as well as strategies for teacher education preparation. A dream that started in Aruba provides a model of practice for all using arts-based education for engagement, social emotional well being, cognitive growth, purpose, service and joy.

Looking to dive deeper into the content of the session? Check out these supporting materials:

- EDT
How can heterogeneity be countered with the help of digital media?
Beate Hennenberg
Beate Hennenberg
University of Music and Performing Arts Vienna, Assistant Professor, Department of Music Pedagogical Research


This article introduces the inclusive music-making band All Stars inclusive, which has been working in online format since the lockdown in 2020.
The distance teaching, which was converted to home teaching, resulted in various settings that had to be adapted in accordance with the current regulations for the ensemble, which normally consists of 30 musicians.
Due to the maximum number of persons, four parallel groups were formed instead of one, for which a more differentiated, more playful and online communicative didactics had to be developed.


Measures for the realiztion of equal opportunities were a concern as well as inclusive and diversity-sensitive teaching content.
The band work at the institute gives students the opportunity to gain musical and social experience in an instrumental pedagogical context in courses. Musicians with various disabilities are invited to make music with students.

Looking to dive deeper into the content of the session? Check out these supporting materials:

- EDT
Inspire Student Confidence and Independence through Perseverance and Growth in the Arts
Adam Goldberg
Adam Goldberg
NYC Schools PS 177, Music Teacher and Apple Distinguished Educator


As arts educators, there is nothing more rewarding than seeing our students learning to express themselves confidently and autonomously via the arts. Although I previously had rewarding experiences facilitating student composition, it was a great surprise to see some of my students take full ownership of their abilities as song writers and start doing so independently. Via video examples and explanation (anecdotes) I will take you through my students’ process from the early stages to the present. As there are so many other ways that many of my students are learning to express themselves as artists, various other significant examples will also be shared and discussed.

Looking to dive deeper into the content of the session? Check out these supporting materials:

- EDT
Learning disabilities in higher education: musical timing deficits and remediation strategies
Sara Raviotta
Sara Raviotta
San Angelo Symphony, Principal Flutist


Accurate perception of time and pulse, as well as execution of rhythm, can be troublesome for students with neurodevelopmental disorders due to slow or inaccurate decoding skills, motor timing skills, visual processing, and rapid temporal processing. Timing deficits can affect performance in core music classes, particularly in the vein of ear training and conducting. Up to 20% of the population could have one or more learning disabilities, making it statistically likely that professors will encounter students with these conditions each year. Students and educators can begin to recognize signs of timing deficits and apply simple strategies for accommodation and remediation.

Looking to dive deeper into the content of the session? Check out these supporting materials:



- EDT
Making Arts Programming Accessible
Kaileigh Anne Tayek
Kaileigh Anne Tayek
School of Arts & Health with Central Florida Community Arts, Director


Central Florida Community Arts (CFCArts) and their Florida Arts & Health Collective focus on the Social Determinants of Health to provide equitable access to the arts for all people. CFCArts reaches thousands of unique individuals across the U.S. through partner based programs and workshops for all populations including those who are aging, under-resourced, and/or medically vulnerable. 


Their most notable programs are UpBeat! Musical Theater (Winner of the 2020 International Hamilton Arts & Innovation Award), a national virtual film and regional in-person theater program for those with varying cognitive abilities and Musical Minds, a sing-a-long choir for those with Dementia & Alzheimer's Disease.


Discover how to create meaningful partnerships, use simple, inexpensive technology, customization tactics, and your own creativity to make the most accessible arts programming for your organizations, students, club, or program.


We are passionate about the arts and would like to share our strategy to encourage arts accessibility for all!

Looking to dive deeper into the content of the session? Check out these supporting materials:

- EDT
Representation and Diversity in the General Music Classroom
Miles Wilcox
Miles Wilcox
Newton Public Schools, Berklee Institute for Arts Education and Special Needs, Music Teacher, Special Needs Music Educator


As teachers become more aware of issues of equity and social justice, for many there is a thirst to work harder and learn more about creating inclusive spaces; not only ones that are representative of the students we have in our classrooms, but also that reflect our fellow citizens of the world. To do this, we must examine our own practices and unpack our own biases and privileges that we bring with us into our classrooms.


This session will focus on how to create an inclusive classroom that represents all students, by increasing awareness of historically underrepresented social groups. We will talk about diversity in terms of race, gender & sexuality, class, culture, and disability. Finally, we will talk about how to make hard decisions about curriculum such as determining when to get rid of previously-loved but problematic songs.

Looking to dive deeper into the content of the session? Check out these supporting materials:

- EDT
The Composition of Community: Tools and Strategies for Inclusive Education Settings
Heather Bryce
Heather Bryce
Bryce Dance Company, Artistic Director, Teaching Artist, Choreographer
Gowri Savoor
Gowri Savoor
Teaching Artists Connect, Visual Teaching Artist


In this fun and fast-paced session, learn some tools and strategies to support students with disabilities, and experience the power of composition through the arts.


Teaching artists Bryce and Savoor will share a digital toolkit for educators and teaching artists that opens the door to a safe and creative inclusive learning environment, while demonstrating how the theme of composition can be explored through multiple art lenses.

Whether introducing collage, tableau, or choreography, the presenters will demonstrate how students can engage the creative process, and generalize skills to make connections, increase communication, build community, and foster learning in other settings. While the strategies are used primarily through dance and the visual arts, they can be adapted to support any art form.

Looking to dive deeper into the content of the session? Check out these supporting materials:

- EDT
What does inclusion truly look like, and who gets to decide?
Elisabeth Staal
Elisabeth Staal
Open Door Arts, Research Fellow


What does inclusion truly look like, and who gets to decide? During this presentation, participants will begin by reflecting on how they consider disability and inclusive teaching and exploring different models of providing arts programs for students with disabilities. After establishing this foundation, the session will turn to considering what systemic and pedagogical characteristics ensure an inclusive space and how decision-makers, leaders, and teachers can know if their space is inclusive. Rooted in the perspectives that no classroom is homogenous, that physiological diversity and neurological diversity should be expected parts of general human diversity, and the importance of holistic support, this session strives to encourage participants to question current spaces and ask how we can better support students with disabilities so they can thrive. The content of this session is based on and inspired by Elisabeth's research at the Harvard Graduate School of Education and administrative and teaching experiences at various arts organizations.

Looking to dive deeper into the content of the session? Check out these supporting materials:

- EDT
Whole Body Learning: Making Trauma Sensitive Art Education Universal
Abby Neale
Abby Neale
Boston Public Schools; Eliot School of Fine and Applied Arts, Arist, Educator


Students with the intersection of disability, trauma, and other marginalized identities experience fear and trauma with their entire body and all their senses. As students recover from the trauma of their learning disrupted by the COVID 19 pandemic, trauma will present itself in more classrooms. My research unpacks these intersections and how trauma affects the body. From this empathetic vantage point, I will present research-supported strategies for taking a universal design approach to a trauma-sensitive classroom. My research will also present examples of how students can heal and cope with trauma through art education.

Looking to dive deeper into the content of the session? Check out these supporting materials:

Sunday, April 10, 2022

- EDT
"Verbatim Bodies": for a theater that emerges from the physicality of the performers
Tra Nguyen
Tra Nguyen
Laboratory for Global Performance and Politics, Georgetown University, Global Fellow


“Verbatim Bodies” is a working hypothesis in theater-making. Comparable to the view of Alain Badiou that a being contains its multitude, it posits that the performing bodies already embed a multitude of characters. In conventional theater, a character implies a distance between it and the actor, and the movement from the latter to the former called acting. This impose of the character on the performer practically negates the performer’s actual physicality, resulting in the expulsion of performers of differently-able physicality's. “Verbatim Bodies” look to let-see the imaginative/fictional characters without moving towards a character, letting-seen the imaginative/fictional spaces around the actual performing bodies. When these spaces collide, a play happens. Drawing from the rich intertextual critical thinking of philosophy, performance, and visual art, this method is essential nowadays, considering the increasing urgency of “diversity” in theater-making.

Looking to dive deeper into the content of the session? Check out these supporting materials:

- EDT
Collaborative initiatives for mindful education through the arts in inclusive classroom environments
Sheila J. Scott
Sheila J. Scott
School of Music at Brandon University, Professor; Author


Many children with exceptionalities are challenged to grow academically, emotionally, and socially in typical school environments. Rather than require students to conform to traditional notions of school, it behooves leaders in education to transform learning environments to the needs of these learners. Our presenters share how approaches grounded in artistic experiences in music, movement, and visual art may create mindful environments for learning. The session opens with an explanation of how this collaboration emerged. Sheila Scott describes facets of an emerging mindfulness program for children in elementary schools, including an overview of weekly 30 minute classroom experiences. Shannon Vogel and Bobbi Schaminee describe how they integrate these activities in mindfulness into the daily routines in their classrooms, highlighting how the activities and resulting classroom environments benefit exceptional learners in these inclusive educational settings.

Looking to dive deeper into the content of the session? Check out these supporting materials:

- EDT
Creating Accessibility in Classical Music Institutions
Erin Parkes
Erin Parkes
McGill University; University of Ottowa; Lotus Centre, Researcher; Adjuct Professor; Founder


There is a longstanding tradition of “gatekeeping” in the classical music world. It is designed to only allow those who are dedicated and talented enough reach the upper levels of music education. Built into that culture of high achievement is a fundamental lack of accessibility for many. Traditional Western classical music education institutions are rife with barriers that create a culture of exclusion, rather than inclusion. In this presentation, we will take a hard look at the barriers that exist in our classical music institutions. What are the policies and practices that contribute to exclusion? What cultural conditions exist in classical music that create barriers to accessibility? What systemic and cultural changes need to take place to allow people of all abilities to access music learning at all levels? This is a call to action for music educators and policy makers.

Looking to dive deeper into the content of the session? Check out these supporting materials:

- EDT
Inclusive Bands: Creating Music Together
Shirley Winner
Shirley Winner
IMAGINE, Founder & CEO


IMAGINE believes that true social change and diversity tolerance grows out of common experiences.

This concept inspired us to establish and operate inclusive bands with musicians with and without special needs. These bands offer participants musical knowledge of classical music instruments alongside technological, opportunity to create and compose musical works, empowering experiences, development of personal skills, teamwork and life skills.

IMAGINE uses a unique pedagogy developed for these bands using innovative teaching methods and incorporates psychological and educational approaches that focus on inclusion and accessibility. Our bands focus on the ability and strengths of each participant and create empowering experience to all participants. This project is working yearly with over 1000 participants nationwide in both schools and afternoon programs. This pedagogy works with full collaboration with the ministry of education and has won 2 international education awards.

Looking to dive deeper into the content of the session? Check out these supporting materials:

- EDT
Linking music, language, and literacy: using research to create an inclusive music classroom accessible to diverse learners.
Jessica Wyton
Jessica Wyton
The Southport School, Musical Director
Jennifer Zuk
Jennifer Zuk
Boston University, Assistant Professor, Director of the Communication and Neurodevelopment Lab (BU)
Kathleen Gallagher
Kathleen Gallagher
The Southport School, Head of Lower School


The Southport School, an independent day school for students with dyslexia and ADHD collaborated with a cognitive neuroscience researcher from Boston University to create a universally designed, general education music program that targets the domains of language and literacy for students with language-based learning disabilities, such as dyslexia. There have been many studies investigating engagement in music in relation to language and learning abilities among students with learning disabilities and ADHD. The presenters will provide an overview of key research linking music, language, and domains related to reading, and demonstrate how to use this research to target non-musical effects of music instruction and its applications in rhythm and timing, pitch, and music notation. Participants will learn how to create a multi-modal, engaging, and inclusive music education classroom that speaks to finding music in the world, allowing students access to a music education that incorporates a variety of learning styles.

Looking to dive deeper into the content of the session? Check out these supporting materials:

- EDT
Music for All: Developing Music Instruction for Students with Higher Support Needs
Brian J. Wagner-Yeung
Brian J. Wagner-Yeung
New York State Special Music Association; NYC Department of Education; CUNY Brooklyn College, Special Learners Chair; Special Education Music Educator; Adjunct Instructor


Music education is a foundational, educational and experiential right for every student. Nevertheless, many music teachers might feel challenged when working with students who require more support in the music classroom. Nevertheless, music teachers can find creative and innovative ways to engage all levels of students as independently as possible. This session will focus on engaging students with limited verbal ability, students who may require hand-over-hand assistance, and students with limited ambulatory access. Music educators will leave with strategies that focus on utilizing a strength-based model, utilizing universal design and assistive technology to give all students access to music-making, and bettering the lives overall of all students through music.

Looking to dive deeper into the content of the session? Check out these supporting materials:

- EDT
Using Design Examples in Arts Courses as On-Going Advocacy for Inclusion in Art and Design Teaching and Projects
Samantha Goss
Samantha Goss
University of Northern Iowa, Assistant Professor


Inclusive design and teaching both consider function and specific audiences. In order to help my students better understand benefits can extend beyond the target audience and to advocate inclusive design, I use DeafSpace as an example in a History of Design class to consider how specific design solutions from that project are beneficial for everyone’s contemporary daily life, as well as questioning why there is still much left to address 31 years after the ADA going into effect. In this presentation, I will use this example to speak to the relationship between a design perspective and the strategic thinking of being an inclusive arts educator. I will share design examples and their problem-solving perspectives that I use when teaching arts and arts education courses to encourage mindsets of possibility as well as seeing how the solutions for exceptional individuals are often beneficial for all.

Looking to dive deeper into the content of the session? Check out these supporting materials:

- EDT
What are we Teaching Teachers? A call to reimagine inclusivity in art education
Chris Hanson
Chris Hanson
Seattle Pacific University, Assistant Professor of Music; Director of Music Education and Orchestral Activities


In this session, Dr. Hanson will discuss what and how we are educating pre-service teachers about inclusivity and the arts. Hanson will offer an informal autoethnography detailing his experiences preparing for and teaching courses focused on serving special populations through music. The session will address specific elements of teacher pedagogy and present strategies and resources for designing and facilitating courses on the topic of inclusive teaching in the arts.

Looking to dive deeper into the content of the session? Check out these supporting materials: