Microservices World

Tuesday, October 26, 2021

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PRO WORKSHOP (MICROSERVICES): Choreography vs Orchestration in Serverless Microservices
Mete Atamel
Mete Atamel
Google, Developer Advocate

We went from a single monolith to a set of microservices that are small, lightweight, and easy to implement. Microservices enable reusability, make it easier to change and scale apps on demand but they also introduce new problems. How do microservices interact with each other toward a common goal? How do you figure out what went wrong when a business process composed of several microservices fails? Should there be a central orchestrator controlling all interactions between services or should each service work independently, in a loosely coupled way, and only interact through shared events? In this talk, we’ll explore the Choreography vs Orchestration question and see demos of some of the tools that can help.

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PRO WORKSHOP (MICROSERVICES): THE (too) MANY FACES OF ARCHITECTURE
Mihaela Ghidersa
Mihaela Ghidersa
Strongbytes, Software Engineer

Too often we encounter the idea that software architecture is an esoteric concept, of which only the chosen ones, and at the right time, are allowed to discuss. Well, how about a little change of perspective? With software development and users' needs evolving so fast, we don’t afford the luxury of rewriting systems from scratch just because teams fail to understand what they are building. Today’s software developers are tomorrow's architects. We must challenge them to step away from the IDE and understand how the architecture evolves in order to create a common and stable ground in terms of quality, performance, reliability, and scalability. At the same time, software architects need to step away from the abstractions and stay updated to the project development reality. This session revolves around finding the right ways of intertwining up-front architecture, API design & coding while maintaining a continuous focus on architecture evolution.

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PRO WORKSHOP (MICROSERVICES): Multicluster Service Mesh Best Practices
Denis Jannot
Denis Jannot
Solo.io, Director of Field Engineering - EMEA

Adoption of Service Mesh is rising and deploying Service Mesh on multiple clusters (on premise, in the cloud, in different clouds, ...) is becoming a standard requirement. But it's also introducing new challenges: - how to ensure each service has a unique identity across the clusters - how to secure the communications between the clusters - how to manage RBAC globally In this talk, I'll focus on Istio and show how to overcome these challenges. I'll introduce SPIFFE and explain how to use trust domains and service accounts to ensure a unique identity globally. I'll also demonstrate how service discovery can be performed natively or using a third party solution, how to simplify cross cluster communications and allow service failover. Finally, I'll cover how a global RBAC can be put in place."

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PRO WORKSHOP (MICROSERVICES): What Are Service Mesh Features That Can Secure Your GraphQL Gateway Platform?
Polerio Babao III
Polerio Babao III
Transunion, Sr Architect, Solutions Architecture

With service mesh, you can secure graphql gateway requirements such as authorization, authentication, ingress, egress, service to service communication, and workload isolation. Those are default service mesh features that you don't have to code or implement. Additionally, using EnvoyFilter for graphql fine-grained authorization ensures that data is provided to allowed consumers only.

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PRO WORKSHOP (MICROSERVICES): Out with the Old “Lift and Shift” - New Techniques for Modernizing Legacy Apps for Cloud Native
Moti Rafalin
Moti Rafalin
vFunction, Co-Founder

Modernizing legacy applications is a critical element of enterprise digital transformation today. Without enhancing technology, technical debt becomes too costly to maintain causing customer and business interruptions and leaving a company increasingly vulnerable to the competition. Enterprises who have tried to lift-and-shift their monolithic applications are often disappointed with their results because “lift and shift” methods don’t allow for enterprises to take full advantage of the value cloud brings. It’s not until a business has refactored their legacy applications into microservices that the true benefits of the cloud can be realized. In this session, Moti Rafalin, CEO and Co-founder of vFunction, will present the four key benefits of moving legacy applications to a cloud native architecture (increased business agility, lower costs, improved scalability and accelerated engineering velocity), and introduce new techniques and best practices to accelerate the app modernization process and a company’s journey to cloud native architecture. This technical workshop will also include insights into how architects and developers can leverage advances in dynamic analysis, data science, and graph theory to advance microservice architecture refactoring to accelerate and refine the decomposition of monolithic applications into microservices.

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PRO WORKSHOP (MICROSERVICES):Hands Off: Automating Zero-Trust Security in CI/CD Pipelines
Tracy Walker
Tracy Walker
NeuVector, Solutions Engineer

Automation is inherent to microservices and container orchestration. Security? Not so much. Container security continues to lag behind in organizations' rush into cloud native modernization, with little security automation usually in place beyond vulnerability scanning and the occasional security policy "suggestion." This session will review the limitations of eBPF-centric security, make clear why it is limited for automating behavioral-based security policies, and demonstrate how to fully automate (hands-off!) behavioral detection, policy creation, and multi-cluster deployment of zero-trust perimeters using NeuVector's patented and unique approach to the growing challenge. Get this right, and you'll be able to automatically detect -- and even prevent -- anomalous activities and zero-day exploits.

Wednesday, October 27, 2021

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PRO TALK (MICROSERVICES): Monitoring Kubernetes vs. Serverless Based Applications
Erez Berkner
Erez Berkner
Lumigo, CEO & Co-Founder

The software we write does not always work as smoothly as we would like. In order to know if something went wrong, understand the root cause, and fix the problem, we need to monitor our system and get alerts whenever issues pop up. There are many useful tools and practices for Kubernetes-based applications. As we adopt serverless architecture can we continue to use the same practice? Unfortunately, the answer is no.In this session we will discuss: The differences between monitoring Kubernetes and serverless based applicationsBest practices for serverless monitoringMethods to efficiently troubleshoot serverless based applications Join our session and start enjoying the great benefits of serverless computing.

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PRO TALK (MICROSERVICES): Advanced Caching Patterns Used by 2000 Microservices
Natan Silnitsky
Natan Silnitsky
Wix.com, Backend Infra Developer

Wix has a huge scale of traffic. more than 500 billion HTTP requests and more than 1.5 billion Kafka business events per day. This talk goes through 3 Caching Patterns that are used by Wix's 2000 microservices in order to provide the best experience for Wix users along with saving costs and increasing availability.  A cache will reduce latency, by avoiding the need of a costly query to a DB, a HTTP request to a Wix servicer, or a 3rd-party service. It will reduce the needed scale to service these costly requests.  It will also improve reliability, by making sure some data can be returned even if aforementioned DB or 3rd-party service are currently unavailable. The patterns include: * Configuration Data Cache - persisted locally or to S3 * HTTP Reverse Proxy Caching - using Varnish Cache * (Dynamo)DB+CDC based Cache and more - for unlimited capacity with continuously updating LRU cache on top each pattern is optimal for other use cases, but all allow to reduce costs and gain performance and resilience.

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PRO WORKSHOP (MICROSERVICES): Hasura as a Rich GraphQL Gateway for Your Frontend Applications
Yshay Yaacobi
Yshay Yaacobi
Livecycle, CTO

There are many advantages to using GraphQL as an API for your frontend, however building a GraphQL server that provides security guarantees, serves entities from your database or other microservices can be very tedious and error prone.By using Hasura, we can start leveraging the power of GraphQL and provide a secure and robust API the can easily connect with our backends and DB.In this talk, I'll provide a short intro to GraphQL, present how we usually build GraphQL servers with tools such Apollo, and then show how this former process can be simplified significantly with Hasura.Afterwards, we'll dive into some of Hasura's advanced features such as row-column permissions, remote joins, actions - that supercharge your GraphQL capabilities. We'll share how we use it internally at Livecycle as our main backend-for-frontend that provides us with much greater control of the security and flexibility for complex data management.

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OPEN TALK (MICROSERVICES): 3 Key Steps for Effective Microservices Testing
Wilhelm Haaker
Wilhelm Haaker
Parasoft, Sr. Solutions Architect

Microservices continue to grow as an architecture for building complex systems. To test microservices, you can use many of the same technologies and techniques used for testing other applications, including API testing. Microservices use well-known technologies, such as REST or queues, for which there are well-established testing tools and best practices. Your infrastructure probably already includes some of these capabilities, whether you’re working onsite or in the cloud.
The unique challenge with microservices is the sheer number of services and their web-like interdependencies that make up an application. With different architectures and protocols employed in microservice development (like Kafka, RabbitMQ, REST, and gRPC), microservices introduce new testing challenges, such as understanding how to effectively monitor event flows.
Join this session to learn key steps to automate testing for orchestrated and reactive (event-driven) architectures, including how to:
Establish a process for testing synchronous and asynchronous event flows.
Monitor event flows to identify and trace messages for validation.
Use simulation to overcome manual steps in an automated test scenario.

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PRO TALK (MICROSERVICES): What a Mesh!
Srinivas Machani
Srinivas Machani
Fiserv, VP, Enterprise Architecture

Utilizing a public cloud like AWS, Azure and others is relatively easy, but building a private cloud for financial systems and applications requires a comprehensive approach from design and security to operation of that private cloud. Fiserv has created a private cloud to host various financial APIs that serve approximately 800 banks in the US. Follow our journey in creating a private cloud and enabling tools for observability and managing it.

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PRO TALK (MICROSERVICES): Accelerating CI/CD Pipelines with Kubernetes Storage Orchestration
Jacob Cherian
Jacob Cherian
ionir, CPO

Continuous Integration/Continuous Delivery (CI/CD) platforms such as Jenkins, Bamboo, CircleCI and the like dramatically speed deployments by allowing administrators to automate virtually every process step. Automating the data layer is the final frontier. Today, hours are wasted manipulating datasets in the CI/CD pipeline. Allowing Kubernetes to orchestrate the creation, movement, reset, and replication of data eliminates dozens of wasted hours from each deployment, accelerating time to market by 500X or more. Using real-life examples, Jacob Cherian, CEO of ionir, will describe the architecture and implementation of a true ‘Data as Code’ approach that allows users to:o Automatically provision compute, networking and storage resources in requested cloud provider / BM environments. o Automatically deploy the required environment-specific quirks (specific kernels, kernel modules, NIC configurations), o Automatically deploy multiple flavors of Kubernetes distributions.o Apply Kubernetes customized deployment (Feature Gates, API server tunables, etc ) o Automate recovery following destructive testing o Replicate datasets to worker nodes instantl The whole point of DevOps is to enable rapid iteration, yet the model falls apart when it comes to moving data through the pipeline. Jacob will discuss how container-native storage and data management solutions can enable truly continuous integration and delivery, allowing organizations to quickly make the changes that serve their customers and provide market differentiation.

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PRO TALK (MICROSERVICES): The Truth about Adopting a Service Mesh
Lin Sun
Lin Sun
Solo.io, Director of Open-Source

Interested in adopting a service mesh? This talk will quickly review the few service mesh projects and dive deep into the dominant service mesh and some adoption best practices and pitfalls to help you jumpstart your adoption of a service mesh. This talk is for users who are interested in getting started with service mesh but not sure where to start. This talk will teach users how to select a service mesh and how to get started with the service mesh, along with some challenges in adopting a service mesh and why service mesh may or may not not be right for you.

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PRO TALK (MICROSERVICES): Your Mess Needs a Mesh
Shannon McFarland
Shannon McFarland
Cisco, Distinguished Engineer and Chief Architect for Cloud Native Technologies


Microservices are becoming more and more prevalent in modern day cloud-native deployments. Even with cloud-native container-based microservice deployments, there can be challenges with consistent and reliable support for L7 metrics, rate limiting, traffic load splitting, circuit breaking, canary deployments, etc. Service Meshes address these issues. The Service Mesh framework takes care of the service discovery, service identity, security, traffic flow management and policy enforcement of each service. In this session, the attendee will learn what common application/service pain points (mess) a Service Mesh can resolve, what a Service Mesh is, how it integrates with Kubernetes and how various microservices can leverage a Service Mesh for things like service discovery and traffic flow management. Linkerd, Envoy and other service mesh types and components will be discussed.

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PRO TALK (MICROSERVICES): Never Design against Requirements
Tal Joffe
Tal Joffe
Nielsen, Engineering Director

Yes, you read it correctly. When I first heard this sentence I didn't get it too. But when I looked back on all the systems I've seen start as small and simple and become a monstrous legacy I realized that not being able to adapt to changes in requirements was the cause.In this talk, I will explain how to create and implement an architecture that is structured around the volatilities of the solution and not its functional requirements.We will talk about a methodological approach to building such an architecture and some tips and guidelines on how to implement this architecture in a real-life NodeJS project

Thursday, October 28, 2021

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PRO TALK (MICROSERVICES): Have You Gotten Your Microservices Observability Right?
Vanya Seth
Vanya Seth
Thoughtworks India, Head of Technology
Bharani Subramaniam
Bharani Subramaniam
Thoughtworks India, Head of Technology

Microservices are hard. There is a huge premium to be paid in order to leverage the benefits this architectural paradigm brings along. With domain driven design at the heart of Microservices, different bounded contexts cooperate to accomplish a business process. Two important questions arise - Is my process working fine? if not why is it failing?  In this talk we will explore the concept of "Observability". Why is it important and how often it's one of the most neglected aspects while designing a Microservices ecosystem.

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PRO TALK (MICROSERVICES): How to Shift Left with Microservices Visibility
Michael Haberman
Michael Haberman
Aspecto, Co-Founder & CTO

Managing dozens or hundreds of distributed services and microservices on a scale can be very challenging. As developers, we are often blind to how our application behaves in production and the areas we need to check to find and prevent issues early on in the development process, before deploying new versions. In this talk, we’ll show you how to leverage the open-source OpenTelemetry to collect and analyze the relevant data from production, and how to use it pre-production, during development and testing phases, to improve your code quality and overall success in preventing issues before deployment.By relying on production behavior, we can automatically generate more efficient tests, catch dependencies that are about to break in real life, and have our developers more productive & product-oriented.

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PRO TALK (MICROSERVICES): Top New CNCF Projects to Look Out For
Annie Talvasto
Annie Talvasto
CAST AI, Product Marketing Manager

The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) bought you such fan favorites like Kubernetes & Prometheus. In this talk Annie Talvasto will introduce you the most interesting and coolest upcoming CNCF tools and projects.This compact and demo-filled talk will give you ideas and inspiration that you can 1) discover new technologies and tools to use in your future projects as well as 2) be the coolest kid in the block, by being up to date with the latest and greatest.

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PRO TALK (MICROSERVICES): Microservices for a Billion People
Tejas Chopra
Tejas Chopra
Netflix, Senior Software Engineer

The food wastage in India is 70 tonnes per year, and there is mismanagement at several layers. Approximately 20-30% of the wastage happens in the last mile, between wholesale traders, and retail mom-and-pop stores. Is there something we can do about food wastage ?  This was the problem statement I attempted to solve as a first engineering hire at a startup. Our customers were 12.8 million retail owners that deal in FMCG (Fast-moving consumer goods, such as food grains, tooth paste, etc.). The goal was to develop a platform for retail traders (mom and pop shop owners / small and medium business owners) to buy FMCG products from wholesale traders using an Android app.We were attacking a deeply entrenched business practice to help solve a societal goal. For a section of the population which is not very well versed with smartphones and technology, the user experience had to be designed from the ground up to be multi-lingual, fungible, unstructured, and relevant. In this talk, I cover how we went about iterating the solution from a simple SMS based system to a full fledged app backed by micro-services. Having a micro-service architecture provided us the agility to experiment and iterate quickly, and we were able to push out changes much faster, and help solve wastage problems even sooner. I will discuss how we laid out the micro services with separation of concerns. I will discuss the several problems we faced in this segment with regards to unstructured data, and how our data models in the micro-services had to adapt. We used cloud services extensively, so I will also cover how different pieces came together in a cogent form to build better experience for our customers. After having worked in bigger companies on software projects that scale to millions of devices, this was a unique challenge for me, and something I am very proud of. I would like to share my experience in building empathetic micro services based software for the masses

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PRO TALK (MICROSERVICES): What are Federated Microservices?
Tyson Midboe
Tyson Midboe
Britelite Immersive, Senior Product Engineer, Systems Architecture

Lecture + Demo What are federated microservices? Federated microservices are independently deployable components of a federated application. In a federated application, components are loaded from multiple network locations and repositories at runtime. They are not developed by a single team or built from a single codebase. Multiple federated application components can run in a single application instance, and can be redeployed at any time, without restarting the application or interrupting other components that happen to be running Why are federated microservices needed? Incidentally, the word “federation” accurately describes the structure of the development organization microservices enables: one made up of small, independent teams with internal autonomy. Let’s consider what provides this autonomy and what role distributed systems architecture or simply “distribution” plays. What is the purpose of distribution in a microservices architecture: scalability, polyglossia, deployment independence? Itenables all three. But which properties are indispensable to the kind of organization we want to support? If we conflate concurrency of users with concurrency of developers, we could say scalability is essential. But in the proper sense of the term, you can also scale a monolith. (Consider Facebook.) Polyglossia opens up the potential developer pool and language fitness for purpose. But what makes each team able to innovate at their own pace without being dependent on the activities of the others? Clearly, its deployment independence. So while distribution may make it easier to scale, scalability is not a reason for implementing microservices. You don’t abandon your monolith because it doesn’t scale, at least in the traditional sense of that word. You abandon it because lack of modularity and proper organization has rendered the codebase brittle and difficult to change or augment as business requirements evolve or your organization grows. The main reason for distribution is deployment independence. Without it, teams have to coordinate their releases and new features may have to wait. It’s what allows teams to work at their own pace of innovation and the business to evolve with speed and alacrity. (You get polyglossia for your trouble). The problem is that distribution increases complexity, and not insignificantly. While it ensures modularity, as every component is now isolated by a hard-and-fast boundary: the network; it makes component interactions harder to develop and the system as a whole harder to manage. What was previously an in-memory function call is now a network call. An entirely new set of circumstances apply. The application will take longer to code and will be harder to test and deploy. Test and deployment automation are absolutely required. Performance will be slower. Troubleshooting will be more difficult, et cetera. All of this raises the barrier to entry for organizations looking to benefit, not from distribution, but from deployment independence. Up to this point, putting up with the microservice premium, as its known, was simply considered a trade-off, not a problem with a potential solution. (Although the solution is commonly mentioned in descriptions of the problem.) The result is a disproportionately high degree of failed implementations, missed opportunity for those forewarned of failure, and growing operational complexity. Consider the “death star” effect or big ball of mud. Let's see how federated applications might solve these problems, with technologies such as: self-deployment, distributed object caching, transparent integration, and module federation.  

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PRO TALK (MICROSERVICES): JWTs as a Microservice Authentication Solution
Dan Moore
Dan Moore
FusionAuth, Head of Developer Relations

JSON web tokens are a stateless portable secure identity transfer format. In this talk, we'll discuss how you can use JWTs to secure your microservices, what signing protocols make sense, and how to handle revocation.

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PRO TALK (MICROSERVICES): Enrich Your Service-to-Service Communication with Web-Assembly
Adam Sayah
Adam Sayah
Solo.io, Field Engineer

Service mesh has been a great solution to resolve some of the issues introduced by the microservice architecture by providing service to service tracing, security, client-side routing, and more, but every company is different, thus a need for the extra mile service-to-service communication customization. In this talk we will explore how to customize the communication between services using webassembly and envoy: - Quick Introduction to webassembly and envo - Building a webassembly filter - Deploying a web webassembly filter between multiple services- Debugging a webassembly filter