Brattleboro Literary Festival 2022 Brattleboro Literary Festival 2022

Pulitzer Prize Finalist

Saturday, October 15, 2022

- EDT
Martin Espada & Doug Anderson
Martín Espada
Martín Espada
Floaters
Doug Anderson
Doug Anderson
Undress, She Said

Martín Espada has published more than twenty books as a poet, editor, essayist and translator. His new book of poems from Norton is called Floaters, winner of the 2021 National Book Award. Other books of poems include Vivas to Those Who Have Failed (2016), The Trouble Ball (2011), The Republic of Poetry (2006) and Alabanza (2003). He is the editor of What Saves Us: Poems of Empathy and Outrage in the Age of Trump (2019). He has received the Ruth Lilly Poetry Prize, the Shelley Memorial Award, the Robert Creeley Award, an Academy of American Poets Fellowship, the PEN/Revson Fellowship and a Guggenheim Fellowship. 

The Republic of Poetry was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. The title poem of his collection Alabanza, about 9/11, has been widely anthologized and performed. His book of essays and poems, Zapata’s Disciple (1998), was banned in Tucson as part of the Mexican-American Studies Program outlawed by the state of Arizona, and reissued by Northwestern. 

A former tenant lawyer in Greater Boston, Espada is a professor of English at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst.

 In Doug Anderson’s newest collection, Undress, She Said, we accompany a speaker undaunted by the complex reckonings of history, evolving relationships, and an aging body, a speaker that, besieged by a storm, resolves to "set out into it, the wind / playing the rigging like a harp." Over and over in these pages, Anderson makes music of the gales and rain and turbulent sea. These poems voyage from the subtle violences of a religious upbringing to complex remembrances of time served in the Vietnam War to contemporary emergencies of real and political plagues. Yet, no matter the subject, compassion rudders these lyrics as they turn always and at last to myriad beloveds-the enigmatic "Angel of Death," literary and mythological influences, kind strangers, the constantly elusive and elusively constant moon. These words reach out to the reader the way the poet addresses frozen joy from the confines of winter: "Red berry trapped in ice, / let me touch you."

- EDT
Women Trailblazers-Janice Nimura & Allison Gilbert
Janice Nimura
Janice Nimura
The Doctors Blackwell
Allison Gilbert
Allison Gilbert
Listen, World!: How the Intrepid Elsie Robinson Became America’s Most-Read Woman

Janice Nimura’s Pulitzer 2022 finalist book The Doctors Blackwell: How Two Pioneering Sisters Brought Medicine to Women and Women to Medicine is a biography of Elizabeth and Emily Blackwell.  In 1849, Elizabeth became the first woman in America to receive an M.D. She was soon joined in her iconic achievement by her younger sister, Emily, who was actually the more brilliant physician. Exploring the sisters’ allies, enemies, and enduring partnership, Janice P. Nimura presents a story of trial and triumph. 

Allison Gilbert’s biography, Listen, World, is the first biography of Elsie Robinson, the most influential newspaper columnist you’ve never heard of. She was a well-known columnist from 1921-1956 and she became the highest-paid woman in the Hearst organization. 

Elsie was also part of the Crowell family in Brattleboro. She married Christie Crowell and they had a son, George. They all lived together, for a time, at Lindenhurst.

- EDT
Roe vs Wade —Joshua Prager
Joshua Prager
Joshua Prager
The Family Roe

Joshua Prager’s Pulitzer Prize finalist book, The Family Roe, looks at “Jane Roe,” the pseudonym for Norma McCorvey (1947–2017), whose unwanted pregnancy in 1969 opened a great fracture in American life. Propelled by the crosscurrents of sex and religion, gender and class, it is a life that tells the story of abortion in America.