Brattleboro Literary Festival 2022 Brattleboro Literary Festival 2022

Videorecorded

Wednesday, October 12, 2022

- EDT (Part 1 of 2)
Hill Journey: The Poetry of William Mundell
Don McLean
Don McLean
The Poetry of William Mundell

This roundtable discussion on Mundell’s life and career will feature  reminiscences by nephews Merrill Mundell, jr and Malcolm Mundell, and great-nephew Eric Mundell.  

Also joining the panel will be Andy Burrows of Guilford, who guided the publication of Mundell’s first volume of poetry by the Stephen Greene Press.  There were three volumes all together.

An exhibit will highlight the poet’s other achievements as a photographer — his work was featured in Life magazine.  

And the evening will conclude with a reading/lecture by Don McLean of Guilford.

 

- EDT (Part 2 of 2)
Hill Journey: The Poetry of William Mundell
Don McLean
Don McLean
The Poetry of William Mundell

This roundtable discussion on Mundell’s life and career will feature  reminiscences by nephews Merrill Mundell, jr and Malcolm Mundell, and great-nephew Eric Mundell.  

Also joining the panel will be Andy Burrows of Guilford, who guided the publication of Mundell’s first volume of poetry by the Stephen Greene Press.  There were three volumes all together.

An exhibit will highlight the poet’s other achievements as a photographer — his work was featured in Life magazine.  

And the evening will conclude with a reading/lecture by Don McLean of Guilford.

 

Saturday, October 15, 2022

- EDT
Adventures in History —Nicole Eustace & Julian Sancton
Julian Sancton
Julian Sancton
Madhouse at the End of the Earth
Nicole Eustace
Nicole Eustace
Covered with Night: A Story of Murder and Indigenous Justice in Early America

Nicole Eustace’s Pulitzer Prize-winning book, Covered with Night: A Story of Murder and Indigenous Justice in Early America, begins on the eve of a major conference between the Iroquois and Anglo-American colonists when a pair of colonial fur traders brutally assaulted a Seneca hunter near Conestoga, Pennsylvania in the winter of 1722. Though virtually forgotten today, the crime ignited a contest between Native American forms of justice. 

Julian Sancton’s NYT best-seller Madhouse at the End of the Earth:The Belgica's Journey into the Dark Antarctic Night is  a true survival story of an early polar expedition that went terribly awry—with the ship frozen in ice and the crew trapped inside for the entire sunless, Antarctic winter. 

- EDT
Safe Places—Julia Glass & Alice Elliott Dark
Julia Glass
Julia Glass
Vigil Harbor
Alice Elliott Dark
Alice Elliott Dark
Fellowship Point

National Book Award-winning author Julia Glass’s new book, Vigil Harbor, is the story of two unexpected visitors who arrive in an insular coastal village, then threaten the equilibrium of a community already confronting climate instability, political violence, and domestic upheavals.  Vigil Harbor transcends the mood of collective but cloistered worry and becomes a novel about what remains. 

In Alice Elliott Dark’s Fellowship Point, two octogenarian women whose long friendship is entangled with their families’ landholdings in coastal Maine, seek to save the acreage from development, and as they do, they must also confront their past choices and find some peace in the present. The New York Times calls it  “a novel rich with social and psychological insights, both earnest and sly, big ideas grounded in individual emotions, a portrait of a tightly knit community made up of artfully drawn, individual souls.”

 

- EDT
Martin Espada & Doug Anderson
Martín Espada
Martín Espada
Floaters
Doug Anderson
Doug Anderson
Undress, She Said

Martín Espada has published more than twenty books as a poet, editor, essayist and translator. His new book of poems from Norton is called Floaters, winner of the 2021 National Book Award. Other books of poems include Vivas to Those Who Have Failed (2016), The Trouble Ball (2011), The Republic of Poetry (2006) and Alabanza (2003). He is the editor of What Saves Us: Poems of Empathy and Outrage in the Age of Trump (2019). He has received the Ruth Lilly Poetry Prize, the Shelley Memorial Award, the Robert Creeley Award, an Academy of American Poets Fellowship, the PEN/Revson Fellowship and a Guggenheim Fellowship. 

The Republic of Poetry was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. The title poem of his collection Alabanza, about 9/11, has been widely anthologized and performed. His book of essays and poems, Zapata’s Disciple (1998), was banned in Tucson as part of the Mexican-American Studies Program outlawed by the state of Arizona, and reissued by Northwestern. 

A former tenant lawyer in Greater Boston, Espada is a professor of English at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst.

 In Doug Anderson’s newest collection, Undress, She Said, we accompany a speaker undaunted by the complex reckonings of history, evolving relationships, and an aging body, a speaker that, besieged by a storm, resolves to "set out into it, the wind / playing the rigging like a harp." Over and over in these pages, Anderson makes music of the gales and rain and turbulent sea. These poems voyage from the subtle violences of a religious upbringing to complex remembrances of time served in the Vietnam War to contemporary emergencies of real and political plagues. Yet, no matter the subject, compassion rudders these lyrics as they turn always and at last to myriad beloveds-the enigmatic "Angel of Death," literary and mythological influences, kind strangers, the constantly elusive and elusively constant moon. These words reach out to the reader the way the poet addresses frozen joy from the confines of winter: "Red berry trapped in ice, / let me touch you."

- EDT
Women Trailblazers-Janice Nimura & Allison Gilbert
Janice Nimura
Janice Nimura
The Doctors Blackwell
Allison Gilbert
Allison Gilbert
Listen, World!: How the Intrepid Elsie Robinson Became America’s Most-Read Woman

Janice Nimura’s Pulitzer 2022 finalist book The Doctors Blackwell: How Two Pioneering Sisters Brought Medicine to Women and Women to Medicine is a biography of Elizabeth and Emily Blackwell.  In 1849, Elizabeth became the first woman in America to receive an M.D. She was soon joined in her iconic achievement by her younger sister, Emily, who was actually the more brilliant physician. Exploring the sisters’ allies, enemies, and enduring partnership, Janice P. Nimura presents a story of trial and triumph. 

Allison Gilbert’s biography, Listen, World, is the first biography of Elsie Robinson, the most influential newspaper columnist you’ve never heard of. She was a well-known columnist from 1921-1956 and she became the highest-paid woman in the Hearst organization. 

Elsie was also part of the Crowell family in Brattleboro. She married Christie Crowell and they had a son, George. They all lived together, for a time, at Lindenhurst.

- EDT
What We Wear — Sofi Thanhauser
Sofi Thanhauser
Sofi Thanhauser
Worn: A People's History of Clothing

In her book, Worn, Sofi Thanhauser tells five stories—Linen, Cotton, Silk, Synthetics, Wool—about the clothes we wear and where they come from. She makes clear how the clothing industry has become one of the planet’s worst polluters and how it relies on chronically underpaid and exploited laborers. 

But she also shows us how micro-communities, textile companies, and clothing makers in every corner of the world are rediscovering ethical methods for making what we wear. 

- EDT
Gender Roles — Tom Perrotta & Elizabeth Nunez
Tom Perrotta
Tom Perrotta
Tracy Flick Can’t Win
Elizabeth Nunez
Elizabeth Nunez
Now Lila Knows

In best-selling author Tom Perrotta’s new book, Tracy Flick Can’t Win, Tracy is a hardworking assistant principal at a public high school in suburban New Jersey. Ambitious but feeling a little stuck and under appreciated, she gets a jolt of good news when the longtime principal abruptly announces his retirement, creating a rare opportunity for Tracy to ascend to the top job. But will she get the job? 

Elizabeth Nunez’s book, What Lila Knows, is the story of Lila,  a professor who has left her home in the Caribbean to join the faculty at a small Vermont college. On her way from the airport, she witnesses the fatal shooting of a Black man,  a professor at the college, by the police,  while giving CPR to a white woman overdosed on opioids. 

Although her black colleagues expect her to be a witness in the case against the police, as an immigrant, she fears speaking out will jeopardize her position at the college. 

 

- EDT
Clementine— Tillie Walden
Tillie Walden
Tillie Walden
Clementine

Award-winning cartoonist Tillie Walden new book is Clementine, from the Walking Dead. She is back on the road, looking to forge a new path all her own. But when she comes across an Amish teenager named Amos, the unlikely pair journeys North to an abandoned Vermont ski resort in Vermont, where they meet up with a small group of teenagers attempting to build a new, walker-free settlement.

 

- EDT
Roe vs Wade —Joshua Prager
Joshua Prager
Joshua Prager
The Family Roe

Joshua Prager’s Pulitzer Prize finalist book, The Family Roe, looks at “Jane Roe,” the pseudonym for Norma McCorvey (1947–2017), whose unwanted pregnancy in 1969 opened a great fracture in American life. Propelled by the crosscurrents of sex and religion, gender and class, it is a life that tells the story of abortion in America. 

 

- EDT
How We Got Here — David Sipress & Tad Friend
Tad Friend
Tad Friend
In The Early Times
David Sipress
David Sipress
What's So Funny: A Cartoonist's Memoir

From a longtime New Yorker staff cartoonist David Sipress  comes What’s So Funny?, an evocative family memoir, a love letter to New York City, and a delightful exploration of the origins of creativity—richly interleaved with the author’s witty, beloved cartoons. 

New Yorker writer Tad Friend’s memoir In the Early Times, grapples with being a husband and a father as he tries to grasp who he is as a son. His father, an erudite historian and the former president of Swarthmore College, has long been gregarious and charming with strangers yet cerebral with his children. Tad writes that “trying to reach him always felt like ice fishing.”

- EDT
New Yorker Cartoonist's Panel
New Yorker Cartoonist's Panel
New Yorker Cartoonist's Panel
New Yorker Cartoonist's Panel
Harry Bliss
Harry Bliss
A Wealth of Pigeons
Ellis Rosen
Ellis Rosen
Send Help!
David Sipress
David Sipress
What's So Funny: A Cartoonist's Memoir
Sofia Warren
Sofia Warren
Radical: My Year with a Socialist Senator
Hilary Price
Hilary Price
Rhymes With Orange

Ever wonder how cartoonists work? New Yorker cartoons have been a lifeline these last few years. Join us when four prominent New Yorker cartoonists, Harry Bliss, Ellis Rosen, David Sipress, and Sofia Warren discuss single panel cartooning and captioning with moderator Hilary Price.

  

Sunday, October 16, 2022

- EDT
Out West Somewhere — Bill Roorbach & Wyn Cooper
Bill Roorbach
Bill Roorbach
Lucky Turtle
Wyn Cooper
Wyn Cooper
Way Out West

Bill Roorbach’s book Lucky Turtle and Wyn Cooper’s book Way out West  both take us out in the West. 

In Lucky Turtle, sixteen-year-old Cindra Zoeller is sent to a reform camp in Montana after being involved in an armed robbery, she is thrust into a world of mountains and cowboys and prayers and miscreants and people from all walks of life like she’s never seen in suburban Massachusetts.  

Way Out West, set in the stark and beautiful landscapes of Nevada and Arizona,  is a wild ride through the complicated worlds of moviemaking, love, drugs, and spying.  

 

- EDT
The Cost of Immigration—Albert Samaha
Albert Samaha
Albert Samaha
Concepcion: An Immigrant Family’s Fortunes
Thirii Myo Kyaw Myint
Thirii Myo Kyaw Myint
Names For Light: A Family History

A pair of authors reflect on living in the US and the immigrant experience.  Nearing the age at which his mother had migrated to the US, part of the wave of non-Europeans who arrived after immigration quotas were relaxed in 1965,

 In  his book Conception, Albert Samaha began to question the ironclad belief in a better future that had inspired his family to uproot themselves from their birthplace. 

Thirii Myint is unable to come to the Festival this year.

- EDT
Dennis Nurkse and Carolyn Forche
Dennis Nurkse
Dennis Nurkse
A Country of Strangers
Carolyn Forché
Carolyn Forché
In the Lateness of the World

“An undisputed literary event,” NPR announced on the recent publication of Carolyn Forche’s new book In The Lateness of the World and Hilton of New Yorker summed up the import of this timely, prophetic book in this way: “History—with its construction and its destruction—is at the heart of In the Lateness of the World. . . . In [it] one feels the poet cresting a wave—a new wave that will crash onto new lands and unexplored territories.” 

What a joy to have this overview of D. Nurske’s marvelous poems, Ilya Kaminsky writes about A Country of Strangers. He is a master of  the lyric mode, one in whose hands the lines come immediately alive, magic breathes, nuance shimmers and becomes the world all its own. Doors open into the unknown and we see that it is strangely familiar because strangeness is, in fact, our first language, one we mouthed before words. Welcome to A Country of Strangers, reader–don’t be surprised if by the time you finish this terrific book you might feel changed, and at home.”

- EDT
Looking Back — Kirthana Ramisetti & Joyce Maynard
Kirthana Ramisetti
Kirthana Ramisetti
Dava Shastri’s Last Day
Joyce Maynard
Joyce Maynard
Count the Ways

In Kirthana Ramisetti’s novel Dava Shastri’s Last Day, a dying billionaire matriarch leaks news of her death early so she can examine her legacy—a decision that horrifies her children and inadvertently exposes secrets she has spent a lifetime keeping. 

Joyce Maynard’s Count the Ways is an epic family saga that follows the lives of Eleanor and Cam all the way from their first meeting, through to their blossoming romance onto their child-rearing years and eventually the demise of their relationship, in the wake of a tragedy that shook the family to its very core.

- EDT
Travelogues — Jordan Salama & Ben Shattuck
Jordan Salama
Jordan Salama
Every Day the River Changes
Ben Shattuck
Ben Shattuck
Six Walks: In the Footsteps of Henry David Thoreau.

Jordan Salama’s Every Day the River Changes is an exhilarating story for a new generation about a journey along Colombia’s Magdalena River, exploring life by the banks of a majestic river, now at risk, and how a country recovers from conflict. 

Ben Shattuck’s book, Six Walks: In the Footsteps of Henry David Thoreau is an account of six journeys taken by Shattuck, each one inspired by a walk once taken by Henry David Thoreau. Six Walks is a resounding tribute to the ways walking in nature can inspire us all. *

*We dedicate Ben Shattuck’s appearance to the memory of J. Parker Huber, longtime festival lover and lifelong follower of the Thoreau’s work.  Memoriam by Tom Slayton here.

- EDT
No Choice — Jennifer Haigh
Jennifer Haigh
Jennifer Haigh
Mercy Street

Jennifer Haigh’s Mercy Street centers on an abortion clinic in downtown Boston, describing the day-to-day realities of the people who go there and exploring the precarious status of safe, legal abortion in this country.

Ann Leary cannot attend the Festival this year. We hope to see her at another Brattleboro Literary Festival.

- EDT
The Effects of Addiction — Tomás Morín & Cindy House
Tomás Q. Morín
Tomás Q. Morín
Let Me Count the Ways
Cindy House
Cindy House
Mother Noise

Growing up in a small town in South Texas, poverty, machismo, and drug addiction were everywhere for Tomás Q. Morín. He was around four or five years old when he first remembers his father cooking heroin, and he recalls many times he and his mother accompanied his father while he was on the hunt for more. Let Me Count the Ways is the memoir of a journey into obsessive-compulsive disorder, a mechanism to survive a childhood filled with pain, violence, and unpredictability. 

Cindy House’s Mother Noise opens with Cindy, twenty years into recovery after a heroin addiction, grappling with how to tell her nine-year-old son about her past. She wants him to learn this history from her, not anyone else; but she worries about the effect this truth may have on him. This memoir is about addiction, motherhood, and Cindy’s ongoing effort to reconcile the two.