Brattleboro Literary Festival 2022 Brattleboro Literary Festival 2022

Thursday, October 13, 2022

- EDT
Celebration of Indie Bookstores-Mason Engel
Mason Engel
Mason Engel
The Bookstour

Join us for a celebration of the return to a live festival! So much to rejoice and what better way to start than by celebrating indie bookstores. Mason Engel will screen his short documentary of interviews with booksellers around the country and discuss it with a panel booksellers. And local indie booksellers will be on hand with their offerings plus festival organizers! Refreshments will be served and we hope you can join us for this important event which is all  about books!

Saturday, October 15, 2022

- EDT
Franklin’s Women—Nancy Rubin Stuart
Nancy Rubin Stuart
Nancy Rubin Stuart
Poor Richard's Women: Deborah Read Franklin and the Other Women Behind the Founding Father.

Everyone knows Benjamin Franklin—the thrifty inventor-statesman of the Revolutionary era—but not about his love life. Nancy Rubin Stuart’s Poor Richard’s Women really humanizes Franklin by revealing the long-neglected voices of the women he loved and lost during his lifelong struggle between passion and prudence.

 From Deborah Read Franklin,  his common law wife of forty-four years, to various romantic other attachments, this book is an outstanding look at the personal side of Benjamin Franklin.

- EDT
Adventures in History —Nicole Eustace & Julian Sancton
Julian Sancton
Julian Sancton
Madhouse at the End of the Earth
Nicole Eustace
Nicole Eustace
Covered with Night: A Story of Murder and Indigenous Justice in Early America

Nicole Eustace’s Pulitzer Prize-winning book, Covered with Night: A Story of Murder and Indigenous Justice in Early America, begins on the eve of a major conference between the Iroquois and Anglo-American colonists when a pair of colonial fur traders brutally assaulted a Seneca hunter near Conestoga, Pennsylvania in the winter of 1722. Though virtually forgotten today, the crime ignited a contest between Native American forms of justice. 

Julian Sancton’s NYT best-seller Madhouse at the End of the Earth:The Belgica's Journey into the Dark Antarctic Night is  a true survival story of an early polar expedition that went terribly awry—with the ship frozen in ice and the crew trapped inside for the entire sunless, Antarctic winter. 

- EDT
Women Trailblazers-Janice Nimura & Allison Gilbert
Janice Nimura
Janice Nimura
The Doctors Blackwell
Allison Gilbert
Allison Gilbert
Listen, World!: How the Intrepid Elsie Robinson Became America’s Most-Read Woman

Janice Nimura’s Pulitzer 2022 finalist book The Doctors Blackwell: How Two Pioneering Sisters Brought Medicine to Women and Women to Medicine is a biography of Elizabeth and Emily Blackwell.  In 1849, Elizabeth became the first woman in America to receive an M.D. She was soon joined in her iconic achievement by her younger sister, Emily, who was actually the more brilliant physician. Exploring the sisters’ allies, enemies, and enduring partnership, Janice P. Nimura presents a story of trial and triumph. 

Allison Gilbert’s biography, Listen, World, is the first biography of Elsie Robinson, the most influential newspaper columnist you’ve never heard of. She was a well-known columnist from 1921-1956 and she became the highest-paid woman in the Hearst organization. 

Elsie was also part of the Crowell family in Brattleboro. She married Christie Crowell and they had a son, George. They all lived together, for a time, at Lindenhurst.

- EDT
Football Fever — Buzz Bissinger
Buzz Bissinger
Buzz Bissinger
Mosquito Bowl: A Game of Life and Death in World War II

From Buzz Bissinger, author of Friday Night Lights, comes The Mosquito Bowl, the story of an epic football game.   On Christmas Eve of 1944, when the 4th and 29th Marine regiments found themselves in the middle of the Pacific Ocean, their ranks included one of the greatest pools of football talent ever assembled. When the trash-talking between the 4th and 29th over who had the better football team reached a fever pitch, it was decided they would play each other.

- EDT
Roe vs Wade —Joshua Prager
Joshua Prager
Joshua Prager
The Family Roe

Joshua Prager’s Pulitzer Prize finalist book, The Family Roe, looks at “Jane Roe,” the pseudonym for Norma McCorvey (1947–2017), whose unwanted pregnancy in 1969 opened a great fracture in American life. Propelled by the crosscurrents of sex and religion, gender and class, it is a life that tells the story of abortion in America. 

 

- EDT
New Yorker Cartoonist's Panel
New Yorker Cartoonist's Panel
New Yorker Cartoonist's Panel
New Yorker Cartoonist's Panel
Harry Bliss
Harry Bliss
A Wealth of Pigeons
Ellis Rosen
Ellis Rosen
Send Help!
David Sipress
David Sipress
What's So Funny: A Cartoonist's Memoir
Sofia Warren
Sofia Warren
Radical: My Year with a Socialist Senator
Hilary Price
Hilary Price
Rhymes With Orange

Ever wonder how cartoonists work? New Yorker cartoons have been a lifeline these last few years. Join us when four prominent New Yorker cartoonists, Harry Bliss, Ellis Rosen, David Sipress, and Sofia Warren discuss single panel cartooning and captioning with moderator Hilary Price.

  

Sunday, October 16, 2022

- EDT
Coming Home--Annie Hartnett & Alison Espach
Annie Hartnett
Annie Hartnett
Unlikely Animals
Alison Espach
Alison Espach
Notes on Your Sudden Disappearance

A pair of New England authors have stories to tell about homecoming coming of age. In Annie Hartnett’s book Unlikely Animals, a girl drops out of medical school and moves home to take care of her father. When she gets home, she's unprepared to find that her former best friend from high school is missing, with no one bothering to look for her. 

In Alison Espach’s book Notes on Your Sudden Disappearance  a young teenager is in awe of her older sister, who seems to have all the answers to life’s questions. When she unexpectedly dies, her younger sister is left to deal with her loss. 

A  wry, sharply observant coming-of-age story that looks at the ways the people we love the most continue to shape our lives long after they’re gone. 

- EDT
Out West Somewhere — Bill Roorbach & Wyn Cooper
Bill Roorbach
Bill Roorbach
Lucky Turtle
Wyn Cooper
Wyn Cooper
Way Out West

Bill Roorbach’s book Lucky Turtle and Wyn Cooper’s book Way out West  both take us out in the West. 

In Lucky Turtle, sixteen-year-old Cindra Zoeller is sent to a reform camp in Montana after being involved in an armed robbery, she is thrust into a world of mountains and cowboys and prayers and miscreants and people from all walks of life like she’s never seen in suburban Massachusetts.  

Way Out West, set in the stark and beautiful landscapes of Nevada and Arizona,  is a wild ride through the complicated worlds of moviemaking, love, drugs, and spying.  

 

- EDT
Looking Back — Kirthana Ramisetti & Joyce Maynard
Kirthana Ramisetti
Kirthana Ramisetti
Dava Shastri’s Last Day
Joyce Maynard
Joyce Maynard
Count the Ways

In Kirthana Ramisetti’s novel Dava Shastri’s Last Day, a dying billionaire matriarch leaks news of her death early so she can examine her legacy—a decision that horrifies her children and inadvertently exposes secrets she has spent a lifetime keeping. 

Joyce Maynard’s Count the Ways is an epic family saga that follows the lives of Eleanor and Cam all the way from their first meeting, through to their blossoming romance onto their child-rearing years and eventually the demise of their relationship, in the wake of a tragedy that shook the family to its very core.

- EDT
No Choice — Ann Leary & Jennifer Haigh
Ann Leary
Ann Leary
The Foundling
Jennifer Haigh
Jennifer Haigh
Mercy Street

Ann Leary’s The Foundling is a compelling record of a too-hidden piece of history when eugenics was commonly applauded as progressive social science. 

This novel, based in part on Leary’s family history, looks at the outrageous ways our society has sought to control women. 

Fast forward to present day: Jennifer Haigh’s Mercy Street centers on an abortion clinic in downtown Boston, describing the day-to-day realities of the people who go there and exploring the precarious status of safe, legal abortion in this country.

- EDT
Global Stories — Brad Kessler & Nathaniel Ian Miller
Nathaniel Ian Miller
Nathaniel Ian Miller
Memoirs of Stockholm Sven

Brad Kessler’s North is the story of the intertwined lives of a Vermont monk, a Somali refugee, and an Afghan war veteran.  The book is grounded in the author’s own corner of Vermont, where there is a Carthusian monastery, a vibrant community of Somali asylum seekers, and a hole left after a disproportionate number of Vermont soldiers were killed in Afghanistan. 

In Nathaniel Ian Miller’s book, Memoirs of Stockholm Sven,  it’s 1916 when Sven Ormson leaves a restless life in Stockholm to seek adventure in an Arctic archipelago where darkness reigns four months of the year. But his time as a miner ends when an avalanche nearly kills him, leaving him disfigured, and Sven flees even further, to an uninhabited fjord. There, with the company of a loyal dog, he builds a hut and lives alone, testing himself against the elements.