Brattleboro Literary Festival 2022 Brattleboro Literary Festival 2022

Brooks Memorial Library

224 Main St., Brattleboro, Vt. 05301

Wednesday, October 12, 2022

- EDT (Part 1 of 2)
Hill Journey: The Poetry of William Mundell
Don McLean
Don McLean
The Poetry of William Mundell

This roundtable discussion on Mundell’s life and career will feature  reminiscences by nephews Merrill Mundell, jr and Malcolm Mundell, and great-nephew Eric Mundell.  

Also joining the panel will be Andy Burrows of Guilford, who guided the publication of Mundell’s first volume of poetry by the Stephen Greene Press.  There were three volumes all together.

An exhibit will highlight the poet’s other achievements as a photographer — his work was featured in Life magazine.  

And the evening will conclude with a reading/lecture by Don McLean of Guilford.

 

- EDT (Part 2 of 2)
Hill Journey: The Poetry of William Mundell
Don McLean
Don McLean
The Poetry of William Mundell

This roundtable discussion on Mundell’s life and career will feature  reminiscences by nephews Merrill Mundell, jr and Malcolm Mundell, and great-nephew Eric Mundell.  

Also joining the panel will be Andy Burrows of Guilford, who guided the publication of Mundell’s first volume of poetry by the Stephen Greene Press.  There were three volumes all together.

An exhibit will highlight the poet’s other achievements as a photographer — his work was featured in Life magazine.  

And the evening will conclude with a reading/lecture by Don McLean of Guilford.

 

Saturday, October 15, 2022

- EDT
Mushrooms Among Us—Melany Kahn
Melany Kahn
Melany Kahn
Mason Goes Mushrooming

This first-of-its kind foraging story from Melany Kahn and Ellen Korbonski,   Mason Goes Mushrooming takes us on a woodland treasure hunt.

Join Melany Kahn for an interactive kid -friendly activities about mushrooms. Examine and identify real local mushrooms. Grab provided materials to make your own wooden, paper or model mushrooms to take home. And the author will be available to lead a mushroom walk in the woods following the event, if you are interested.

A brilliant introduction to mushrooms for children!

 

- EDT
Definitely Nat! —Maria Scrivan
Maria Scrivan
Maria Scrivan
Nat Enough

Maria Scrivan is the New York Times best-selling author of a series of graphic novels for middle-grade:

Nat Enough,  Forget Me Nat, Absolutely Nat, and the forthcoming Nat for Nothing. The books follow Nat as she navigates the minefield of middle school, finding herself; making and losing friends along the way. 

 

- EDT
What We Wear — Sofi Thanhauser
Sofi Thanhauser
Sofi Thanhauser
Worn: A People's History of Clothing

In her book, Worn, Sofi Thanhauser tells five stories—Linen, Cotton, Silk, Synthetics, Wool—about the clothes we wear and where they come from. She makes clear how the clothing industry has become one of the planet’s worst polluters and how it relies on chronically underpaid and exploited laborers. 

But she also shows us how micro-communities, textile companies, and clothing makers in every corner of the world are rediscovering ethical methods for making what we wear. 

- EDT
How We Got Here — David Sipress & Tad Friend
Tad Friend
Tad Friend
In The Early Times
David Sipress
David Sipress
What's So Funny: A Cartoonist's Memoir

From a longtime New Yorker staff cartoonist David Sipress  comes What’s So Funny?, an evocative family memoir, a love letter to New York City, and a delightful exploration of the origins of creativity—richly interleaved with the author’s witty, beloved cartoons. 

New Yorker writer Tad Friend’s memoir In the Early Times, grapples with being a husband and a father as he tries to grasp who he is as a son. His father, an erudite historian and the former president of Swarthmore College, has long been gregarious and charming with strangers yet cerebral with his children. Tad writes that “trying to reach him always felt like ice fishing.”

Sunday, October 16, 2022

- EDT
Pig Years— Ellyn Gaydos
Ellyn Gaydos
Ellyn Gaydos
Pig Years

As a farmer in Upstate New York and Vermont, Ellyn Gaydos lives on the edge between loss and gain. Her debut memoir, Pig Years, draws us into this precarious world, conjuring with stark simplicity the lifeblood of the farm: its livestock and stark full moons, the sharp cold days lives near to the land. A long time farmer, Ellyn’s love of farms is reflected throughout the book. 

 

- EDT
Partners in Life— Kathryn Davis & Eleanor Henderson
Kathryn Davis
Kathryn Davis
Aurelia, Aurelia
Eleanor Henderson
Eleanor Henderson
Everything I Have Is Yours: A Marriage

A pair of memoirs, Aurelia, Aurelia from Kathryn Davis and Everything I Have is Yours from Eleanor Henderson explore the joy and sorrow of their marriages and lives. At the center of Davis’s book is  the death of her husband, Eric. The book unfolds as a study of their marriage, its deep joys and stinging frustrations.  

Henderson’s book, emotional, intimate, and at times agonizing, tells the story of a marriage tested by powerful forces outside both partners’ control. It’s not only a memoir of a wife’s tireless quest to heal her husband, but also one that asks just what it means to accept someone as they are.

- EDT
The Cost of Immigration—Albert Samaha & Thirii Myint
Albert Samaha
Albert Samaha
Concepcion: An Immigrant Family’s Fortunes
Thirii Myo Kyaw Myint
Thirii Myo Kyaw Myint
Names For Light: A Family History

A pair of authors reflect on living in the US and the immigrant experience.  Nearing the age at which his mother had migrated to the US, part of the wave of non-Europeans who arrived after immigration quotas were relaxed in 1965,

 In  his book Conception, Albert Samaha began to question the ironclad belief in a better future that had inspired her family to uproot themselves from their birthplace. 

Thirii Myint’s memoir, Names for Light, traverses time and memory to weigh three generations of a family's history against a painful inheritance of postcolonial violence and racism. 

- EDT
Travelogues — Jordan Salama & Ben Shattuck
Jordan Salama
Jordan Salama
Every Day the River Changes
Ben Shattuck
Ben Shattuck
Six Walks: In the Footsteps of Henry David Thoreau.

Jordan Salama’s Every Day the River Changes is an exhilarating story for a new generation about a journey along Colombia’s Magdalena River, exploring life by the banks of a majestic river, now at risk, and how a country recovers from conflict. 

Ben Shattuck’s book, Six Walks: In the Footsteps of Henry David Thoreau is an account of six journeys taken by Shattuck, each one inspired by a walk once taken by Henry David Thoreau. Six Walks is a resounding tribute to the ways walking in nature can inspire us all. *

*We dedicate Ben Shattuck’s appearance to the memory of J. Parker Huber, longtime festival lover and lifelong follower of the Thoreau’s work.  Memoriam by Tom Slayton here.

- EDT
Urban Division and Decay — Nicholas Dawidoff
Nicholas Dawidoff
Nicholas Dawidoff
The Other Side of Prospect: A Story of Violence, Injustice, and the American City

Nicholas Dawidoff’s book, The Other Side of Prospect, interweaves social history, true crime, and biography in this sprawling report on the 2006 murder of a grandfather in New Haven, CT. is a sweeping account of how the injustices of racism and inequality reverberate through the generations, and a beautifully written portrait of American city life, told through a group of unforgettable people and their intertwined experiences.

- EDT
The Effects of Addiction — Tomás Morín & Cindy House
Tomás Q. Morín
Tomás Q. Morín
Let Me Count the Ways
Cindy House
Cindy House
Mother Noise

Growing up in a small town in South Texas, poverty, machismo, and drug addiction were everywhere for Tomás Q. Morín. He was around four or five years old when he first remembers his father cooking heroin, and he recalls many times he and his mother accompanied his father while he was on the hunt for more. Let Me Count the Ways is the memoir of a journey into obsessive-compulsive disorder, a mechanism to survive a childhood filled with pain, violence, and unpredictability. 

Cindy House’s Mother Noise opens with Cindy, twenty years into recovery after a heroin addiction, grappling with how to tell her nine-year-old son about her past. She wants him to learn this history from her, not anyone else; but she worries about the effect this truth may have on him. This memoir is about addiction, motherhood, and Cindy’s ongoing effort to reconcile the two.