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Latinx Voices

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Track 3 Poetry -> Online Zoom Link in Description

Tomás Q. Morín is the author of the forthcoming poetry collection Machete and the forthcoming memoir Let Me Count the Ways . His first collection of poetry A Larger Country was the winner of the American Poetry Review/Honickman Prize and runner-up for the PEN/Joyce Osterweil Award. Patient Zero, his second poetry collection, was described by Publishers Weekly in a starred review as “striking in capturing everyday actions with startling, musical wit.” With Mari L’Esperance he co-edited Coming Close: Forty Essays on Philip Levine, a book that explores the art and value of Philip Levine’s five decades of teaching. In his work as a translator, Morín translated Pablo Neruda’s visionary The Heights of Macchu Picchu, as well as Luisa Pardo & Gabino Rodriguez’s libretto Pancho Villa From a Safe Distance, a magisterial opera composed by Graham Reynolds. He lives in Houston.

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Deborah Paredez
Year of the Dog

Deborah Paredez is a poet, performance scholar, and cultural critic whose writing explores the workings of memory, the legacies of war, and feminist elegy. She is the author of the poetry collections Year of the Dog, This Side of Skin, and of the critical study Selenidad: Selena, Latinos, and the Performance of Memory. Her poetry and essays have appeared in The New York Times, Los Angeles Review of Books, Boston Review, Poetry, Poet Lore, and in the anthology, Inheriting the War: Poetry and Prose by Descendants of Vietnam Veterans and Refugees. Paredez received her PhD in Interdisciplinary Theatre and Performance at Northwestern University and her BA in English at Trinity University. She is a co-founder of CantoMundo, a national organization that cultivates a community of Latinx poets, which she also served as a co-director from 2009–2019. Born and raised in San Antonio, she lives in New York City where she is a professor of creative writing and ethnic studies at Columbia University.


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Tomas Morin’s new collection Machete addresses some of the concerns of life as a Mexican American in his home state of Texas. It is infused more generally with a fresh and zany take on the diversity of our culture, bringing together seemingly disparate scraps of history, geography, ideology, and sensibility—as here, where we find Willie Mays, Marx, moon shot, and a bit of miracle. In these poems, culture crashes like waves and leaves behind Billie Holiday and the CIA, disco balls and Dante, the Bible and Jerry Maguire. They are long, lean, and dazzle in their telling. 

In the tradition of women as the unsung keepers of history, Deborah Paredez’s second poetry collection, Year of the Dog, tells her story as a Latina daughter of the Vietnam War.The title refers to the year 1970―the “year of the Metal Dog” in the lunar calendar―which was the year of the author’s birth, the year her father prepared to deploy to Vietnam along with many other Mexican-American immigrant soldiers, and a year of tremendous upheaval across the United States.

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