Join event to build your agenda.

KEYNOTE: Mattermost - How to Accelerate Hiring and Retention of Software Engineers through Developer-Friendly Workplace PR

- PDT
Main Stage
Join on Hopin

Ian Tien
Mattermost, CEO, Co-Founder

Ian is CEO and Co-Founder of Mattermost. He previously founded SpinPunch, Inc., an online video game company with millions of players across 190 countries. Prior to SpinPunch, Ian was VP of Product at Flickme, a movie streaming startup backed by Sequoia Capital, Warner Brothers, and Sony Pictures. He also ran product management for Microsoft SkyDrive (now “OneDrive”) and Hotmail (now “Outlook.com”) and led engineering teams for Microsoft Office.
Ian holds over a dozen patents in analytic applications and is an alumnus of the University of Waterloo, where he worked at Trilogy Software during school, and the Stanford Graduate School of Business, where he served as a teaching assistant for Andy Grove and Myron Scholes. 


How to accelerate hiring and retention of software engineers through developer-friendly workplace practices
Can’t hire developers? Losing the ones you have? Take a closer look at your collaboration tools--are they attracting or repelling your talent?
In a remote world, employee experience is digital experience.
Without offices, catered lunches, and fancy meeting rooms, the quality of a workplace comes down to online tools you use to communicate and get work done. HR and facilities can’t help. Nor can any other C-suite exec. It's up to CIOs and technology leaders to make the single most important decision affecting workplace satisfaction:
Will you centralize the selection of collaboration tools to save on cost--or will you give business units and departments the freedom to make their own choices, at the risk of sprawl?
Most importantly, do your IT and finance leaders understand the impact of these decisions on your organization’s ability to attract and retain software developers?
In this talk we'll discuss needs from an array of leading development organizations--from fast growing startups to tech giants to the world's largest banks--and what worked and didn't work in building a digital workplace that developers love.