LimmudFest 2021 LimmudFest 2021

Jewish History

Sunday, March 14, 2021

- CDT
Buried and Alive: Memory, Commemoration, and Identity in Southern Jewish Cemeteries
Nora Katz
Nora Katz
Goldring/Woldenberg Institute of Southern Jewish Life (ISJL), Director of Heritage and Interpretation
Dr. Josh Parshall
Dr. Josh Parshall
Goldring/Woldenberg Institute of Southern Jewish Life (ISJL), Director of the History Department

What is the history of Jewish burial in the Gulf South? How do we remember and commemorate the dead? What can cemeteries tell us about the development and evolution of southern Jewish communities? Join us for a virtual tour of southern Jewish cemeteries, with a special focus on New Orleans. We'll learn about cemeteries in big cities and small towns, think about what these sites can teach us about tensions between assimilation and tradition, and consider the fascinating nuances of Jewish burial culture. We'll also learn about what it takes to preserve these historic places, and how you can engage with historic cemeteries in your home community. This session is offered by the Goldring/Woldenberg Institute of Southern Jewish Life (ISJL), based in Jackson, Mississippi. Learn more about us at www.isjl.org.

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Where the 'Vilde Chayes' Are: Maurice Sendak's Creative Jewish Vision
Dr. Golan Moskowitz
Dr. Golan Moskowitz
Tulane University, Assistant Professor of Jewish Studies and Catherine and Henry J. Gaisman Faculty Fellow

The late Jewish American artist Maurice Sendak (1928-2012) changed the face of children’s literature and paved the way for the reconsiderations of Otherness that pervade contemporary media. His emotionally isolated, unruly, and ethnically particular protagonists use fantasy to resist social coercion and self-erasure. In 'Wild Visionary: Maurice Sendak in Queer Jewish Context' (Stanford University Press, 2020), Golan Moskowitz investigates the evolution of Sendak’s artistic vision and its appeal for American, Jewish, and queer audiences. The present talk will offer a pointed discussion of 'Wild Visionary,' illuminating how Sendak’s multiple perspectives as a Holocaust-conscious, American-born son of Yiddish-speaking Jewish immigrants informed his life and work. It will also explore how the artist’s work interacted with his cultural surroundings, offering insights into experiences of marginality and emotional resilience that remain relevant and visionary to this day. For 20% off your purchase of 'Wild Visionary,' use code VISIONARY20 at checkout here: <a href=https://www.sup.org/books/title/?id=31783>Purchase here</a>

- CDT
Southern Jewish History on One Foot
Nora Katz
Nora Katz
Goldring/Woldenberg Institute of Southern Jewish Life (ISJL), Director of Heritage and Interpretation
Dr. Josh Parshall
Dr. Josh Parshall
Goldring/Woldenberg Institute of Southern Jewish Life (ISJL), Director of the History Department

From the development of Jewish communities in eighteenth-century port cities to the rise and fall of small-town Jewish merchants to the explosive growth of Jewish life in sunbelt cities like Miami and Atlanta, Jews have been deeply engaged with the development of the American South. This session packs 400 years of Southern Jewish history into a digestible, interactive presentation that illustrates the Jewish South's importance to both Southern and Jewish histories.

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In Quarantine with Anne Frank
Dr. Naomi Yavneh Klos
Dr. Naomi Yavneh Klos
Loyola University of New Orleans, Professor of Languages and Cultures

In the early days of the pandemic, the name Anne Frank was everywhere, whether as a Facebook meme or as a stern warning never to forget the unique horror of the Holocaust. But although Anne Frank is an iconic figure for Jews and non-Jews alike, most of us do not know the nuances of her story or its context in the Dutch experience of World War II. We also may not be aware that the "diary" we read is, in fact, a combination of Anne’s daily diary and her own (incomplete) revision, which she hoped to publish after the war. Looking at examples of Anne’s own writing and re-writing, we will consider how she might serve as a model of spiritual resilience and hope in a time of anxiety and hate.

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Noel Coward with a Social Conscience: A Re-discovery of the great Jewish-American Composer Harold Rome

Please join me as we rediscover the great Broadway composer Harold Rome (1908-1993) -- whose fantastic songs have delighted audiences since the late 1930s. Harold Rome's most famous shows include: "Fanny," "Wish You Were Here," and "Pins and Needles." In addition to his talents as a composer, Rome, a Yale graduate, was also a fine painter and had trained as an architect. Throughout his life, he was also a dedicated social activist - lending his name to many important causes. You will hear incredibly beautiful music and learn about one of the great composers of Broadway's Golden Age.

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Jewish Leadership in Turbulent Times
Aaron Ahlquist
Aaron Ahlquist
Anti-Defamation League (ADL), Regional Director
Arnie Fielkow
Arnie Fielkow
Jewish Federation of Greater New Orleans, CEO

Join ADL Regional Director Aaron Ahlquist and Jewish Federation of Greater New Orleans CEO Arnie Fielkow for a discussion moderated by New Orleans Councilman Joe Giarrusso about meeting the challenges facing the Jewish community in an environment of polarization, rising Antisemitism, pandemic, and fraying Jewish unity and identity. The conversation will frame the challenges, and discuss the work being done to navigate the troubled waters.

This session is generously sponsored by the Goldring Family Foundation Center for Jewish-Multicultural Affairs.