New Directions in Arts Administration: Who, What, Why & How New Directions in Arts Administration: Who, What, Why & How

Paper Session

Monday, May 23, 2022

- EDT
Public Perceptions of Artists: A vantage on artists before and two years into the pandemic
Jennifer Novak Leonard
Jennifer Novak Leonard
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), Research Associate Professor and Research Director of the Arts Impact Initiative in the College of Fine and Applied Arts; SNAAP Board Vice President & Research Director

This research examines public perceptions of artists. This study examines if public opinions of artists have changed since the start of the pandemic and provides insights on current public perceptions of artists, discussed in light of the many challenges catalyzed by the pandemic that have disproportionately impacted segments of artists and relevance to the training of arts administrators. This study utilizes cross-sectional survey data collected from over 2,000 U.S. adults in 2019 and 2022.

- EDT
No Theater Left Behind: A Case for Digital Programming
Thomas Breeden
Thomas Breeden
Goucher College, MA in Arts Administration student

The COVID-19 pandemic presented nonprofit theaters an immediate and critical choice: shut down until the health concerns passed, or shift to digital programming to continue to serve audiences. Now, as theaters reopen their physical spaces, an equally existential choice has emerged: leave COVID-era digital programming behind, or continue to incorporate digital programming moving forward.

This presentation answers a timely question for the post-COVID era: Why invest in digital programming for the long haul? “No Theater Left Behind” presents a research-driven case to convince arts managers, boards, and other stakeholders that digital programming is essential to the future of nonprofit theater, even post-COVID.

- EDT
Can Everyone See My Screen?: Recommendations for Arts Organizations Navigating Hybrid Digital Engagement
Michael Pritchard
Michael Pritchard
University of Kentucky, Arts Administration Doctoral Student at the University of Kentucky
Gabriela Shutt
Gabriela Shutt
Pacific Northwest Ballet, Seattle Arts Fellowship
Alaina Faulkner
Alaina Faulkner
Florida State University Libraries, Distance Library Services Assistant

Arts organizations constantly adjusted the ways they functioned digitally during the pandemic’s height. As COVID-19-related mandates evolve to allow for more in-person programming, organizations which utilized digital engagement to remain relevant must determine which aspects are most valuable. We will explore impacts of continued expanded digital engagement as organizations continue to readjust programming; and, provide recommendations for arts organizations to consider long-term. Presented by Michael Pritchard, Alaina Faulkner (Distance Library Services team at Florida State University), and Gabriela Shutt (Community Engagement Fellow at the Pacific Northwest Ballet), this work seeks to support arts organizations navigating the new hybrid frontier.

Tuesday, May 24, 2022

- EDT
Higher Education Institution Affiliations and the Financial Impact on Professional Nonprofit Theatres in New England
Jay Pension
Jay Pension
Florida State University

The challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic have left many arts organizations examining paths to increase financial sustainability. This paper presentation reports on a study conducted in fall of 2021 on financial differences between nonprofit theatres in New England with and without discernible affiliations with higher education institutions (HEIs). The study examined if there were statistically significant differences for theatres with and without a discernible HEI affiliation regarding annual revenue, the percentage of expenses to revenue, and between the percentage of employee expenses to total expenses for theatres that did and did not have discernible partnerships with an HEI.

- EDT
Radical Grace: How the Arts Administration sector can leverage digital engagement events to accomplish democratic participation in the field
Jordan Campbell
Jordan Campbell
Creative Generation, Director, Research & Knowledge
Jeff M Poulin
Jeff M Poulin
Creative Generation, Managing Director

Throughout the pandemic, we all witness both positive and negative outcomes from our rapid responses. This session will share the outcomes of a body of research which examined how arts and cultural education programs responded to the COVID-19 crisis (among other concurrent crises occurring in the U.S. and worldwide). A specific phenomena that was observed was the use of ‘radical grace,’ which will showcase: 1. Holding space for equitable conversation, employing community norms structure; 2. Integrated practices of mindfulness to ground practitioners in uncertain circumstances; and 3. Co-creating learning sessions, reimagining strategies for the classroom through arts-based and virtual lenses.

- EDT
Design for social change: on new practices that foster knowledge transfers from design sector elsewhere
Dr. Lyudmila Petrova
Dr. Lyudmila Petrova
CREARE Social
Cristian Campagnaro
Cristian Campagnaro
Politecnico di Torino, Associate Professor at Department of Architecture and Design

This paper first reveals the practice of design for a social change in the case study of “Costruire Bellezza”, a permanent and interdisciplinary laboratory aimed at social cohesion. The rationale of the workshops is to stimulate “beautiful heals” for the homeless through fostering their own creative potential and the experience of relationships with the others (Campagnaro, Porcellana, 2016). Second the paper discusses an interdisciplinary methodology through the integration of both Design Anthropology Approach and Value - Based Approach to capture in a systematic way the way shared values are generated and/or enhanced throughout the design activities.

- EDT
An Arts Administration Educator's Guide to Teaching "Arts in Health"
Patricia Dewey Lambert
Patricia Dewey Lambert
University of Oregon, Professor, School of Planning, Public Policy and Management

As the world recovers from the trauma of COVID-19, arts leaders everywhere are being called on to promote public health, support community well-being, and enhance the healthcare experience. “Arts in health” is a large academic and professional field that engages the arts in support of health and well-being. Arts administration educators will benefit greatly from the educational resources in this field provided by the National Organization for Arts in Health (NOAH), especially its new Core Curriculum for Arts in Health Professionals.

- EDT
The ‘Shadow Pandemic’ of Gender-Based Violence (GBV): Activism Art Raises Awareness about GBV During a Global Crisis
Tanya Sharp (She/Her)
Tanya Sharp (She/Her)
Delinea, Principal UX Designer

Public art and activism art diverge where activism art is built on concepts of audience, relationships, communication, and political intention where public art is centered in “place” or “location” (Lacy, 1995). Historically public art is grounded on the principle that establishing art accessibility, can solve societal issues, however, public art can’t heal those affected during volatile times such as a pandemic, war, or famine (Mlambo-Ngcuka, 2020). Through the lens of personal experience, a literature review, case study analysis, interviews, and visual mapping, this project examines how public art can provide routes to new conceptions of community and provide avenues to heal.

Wednesday, May 25, 2022

- EDT
Wearing Multiple Hats: Expanding and Evolving Multiple Professional Identities in the Arts & Cultural Sector during the Covid-19 Pandemic
Jordan Campbell
Jordan Campbell
Creative Generation, Director, Research & Knowledge

Through a deep analysis of a wide range of field research on multi-hyphenate identity, this paper examines the unique difficulties and advantages faced by professionals in the arts and cultural sector who hold multiple identities simultaneously: artists who teach, independent contractors with several contract jobs, musicians who are activists, etc. Further, the ever-expanding and evolving identity of those who previously wore "one hat" will be explored, with a focus on how the pandemic has perhaps pushed them toward a multi-hyphenate identity. This paper presents the challenges and opportunities presented by Covid, and how the pandemic continues to shape multidisciplinary work in arts and culture.

- EDT
Engaging Non-Arts Students In Arts Administration
Elise Kieffer
Elise Kieffer
Murray State University, Program Director and Assistant Professor of Nonprofit Leadership Studies

The focus of this presentation is the emphasis on facilitating and enabling student-led learning. By its nature, this requires the educator to utilize uniquely relevant examples, case studies, and other educational tools to promote relevance and resonance for each student. The old models of teaching all students the same do not work with this population of students. This presentation provides specific strategies for promoting student-led learning.

- EDT
Amplifying Student Voices: Opportunities for Expression through a Collaborative Public Photography Project
Carolina Blatt-Gross
Carolina Blatt-Gross
The College of New Jersey, Associate Professor of Art Education

Filling a void created by the pandemic and exacerbated by educational inequities, the AMPLIFY workshop employed issue-based art education to encourage local high school students to explore personal, local, and global change through digital and hand-manipulated photography. With a focus on access to studio resources and instruction, the resulting installation of collaborative public art in the windows of the campus Art building offered a visible platform to amplify underrepresented youth perspectives.

- EDT
Adaptive Impact Planning: Towards a New Model of Strategic Planning For Rapidly Changing Times
Bridget Woodbury
Bridget Woodbury
Creative Generation, Director, Communications & Engagement
Jeff M Poulin
Jeff M Poulin
Creative Generation, Managing Director

Anecdotal evidence suggests that organizational planning that focuses on an organization’s impact within its community is more likely to result in programming that successfully meets its mission and serves its stakeholders, avoiding mission creep. Unlike a traditional strategic plan alone, the Adaptive Impact Plan (AIP) — developed by Bridget Woodbury, Director of Communications and Engagement at Creative Generation, as part of her Master's Thesis in 2015 — centers around the mission, and uses information collected from stakeholders to answer the question "what now?" whether you're faced with a $100 million dollar donation or a global pandemic.

Thursday, May 26, 2022

- EDT
Dancing in the Metaverse: Designing an interdisciplinary flagship Arts Projects module
Natalia Grincheva
Natalia Grincheva
LASALLE College of the Arts, Program Leader

The presentation will reflect on my experience participating in the Hackathon ‘Dancing in the Metaverse’ organized by the major performing arts venue in Singapore, Esplanade, in January 2022. I led the team of Arts Management and Dance students from LASALLE College of the Arts to propose a project for creating a virtual public art festival space in Singapore. The project has provided a platform for redesigning the Arts Projects module in the BA Arts Management curriculum by developing a new flagship interdisciplinary course that will engage Singapore arts industries and benefit students from across different faculties, schools, and programs at LASALLE.

- EDT
Career Impacts of the Pandemic: A Longitudinal Study
Douglas DeNatale
Douglas DeNatale
Boston University, Associate Professor of the Practice / Program Director, Boston University Arts Administration Program

Drawing from an ongoing longitudinal study of career outcomes for arts managers in Greater Boston following the Covid-19 pandemic, this paper will outline preliminary findings at a point two years from the outset of the pandemic. In collaboration with ArtsBoston, the Boston University Arts Administration Program is examining individual arts professionals' career outcomes immediately after and over the course of the region's recovery. From a large sample drawn from over 900 nonprofit arts organizations in greater Boston, the study traces the subsequent career trajectories of individual arts managers who were employed by these organizations in February 2020.

- EDT
The Los Angeles 1932 and Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games: An Arts Administration Perspective
Tiffany Bourgeois
Tiffany Bourgeois
The Ohio State University, Assistant Professor

This comparative case study utilizes mega-event legacy theory (Preuss, 2007) to examine how the Great Depression and the corona virus pandemic impacted the size, scale, and participation of the cultural programming the Los Angeles 1932 and Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games. It also explores how these factors affected the host’s approach to cultural diplomacy (Cummings, 2003) during the Olympic games. This study frames the cultural programming as cultural diplomacy and identifies potential cultural outcomes like changes in international perception, relationship building and interactions between artists and organizations.

- EDT
Nonprofit Arts Education in NYC: Administrative and Financial Challenges in Government-Nonprofit Relationships
Keith E Kaminski
Keith E Kaminski
CUNY Baruch College

A large volume of arts instruction in NYC public schools is provided by arts and cultural nonprofits with funding from city agencies through grants and contracts. Using a mixed methods approach, this project collects data from nonprofit professionals to study the demographics of their organizations and their experiences with city agencies. Participants report a range of administrative and financial challenges encountered in their work and a fundamentally different understanding of the nature of the relationship compared to that of agency administrators. Specific recommendations are offered to improve collaboration, streamline and clarify administrative processes, and prioritize consistency and equity in funding.

- EDT
Disassembling the Hierarchy of Dance in Academia
Stefanie Fatooh
Stefanie Fatooh
Seattle University, MFA in Arts Leadership Candidate, 2022

To better understand changes that could be made within academic dance programs, this paper presents reflections from faculty members within the dance programs at Arizona State University, Wesleyan University and the University of Colorado Boulder. Presented in relation to each other, these interviews will demonstrate ways that the former hierarchy of dance can be disassembled and creative changes can be made in order to better embrace the need for polyvocality in dance studies. This dialogue can also serve as a powerful template for academic and other systems that are seeking to make meaningful and inclusive changes.

- EDT
Salary Disclosure in Arts Administration Job Postings
Karen Munnelly
Karen Munnelly
Florida State University, Director of Arts Administration & Assistant Professor

This presentation focuses on whether increasing discourse surrounding the link between pay transparency and salary equity has resulted in arts organizations disclosing salary information in their job postings. Data regarding whether salary was disclosed in arts administration job postings was collected over a seven-month period. Over 800 job postings were analyzed to determine if they provided details on salary. The presentation also investigates if salary disclosure has an effect on what positions arts administrators choose to apply for. The findings indicate that many arts organizations still do not provide salary information in the job description even though it is an important factor for candidates.

Friday, May 27, 2022

- EDT
Do American Universities Provide BIPOC Artists with the Non-Academic Learning Experiences Needed for Entrepreneurial Careers?
Dr. Wen Guo
Dr. Wen Guo
Elon University, Assistant Professor of Arts Administration
David McGraw
David McGraw
Elon University, Professor and Program Director of Arts Administration

Supported by the Strategic National Arts Alumni Project (SNAAP) program, this paper investigates the following research questions: 1) What are the BIPOC arts alumni’s experiences with the non-academic offerings of their higher education institutions, including career development services, campus culture on innovation and diversity, and relationship with local communities? 2) How do their experiences compare to white alumni and across different minority groups? 3) How do such experiences influence arts alumni’s entrepreneurial career choices, with other relevant factors, specifically entrepreneurship skill training, student loan debt, familial resources, gender, and age, are taken into consideration.