New Directions in Arts Administration: Who, What, Why & How New Directions in Arts Administration: Who, What, Why & How

Who

Monday, May 23, 2022

- EDT
Public Perceptions of Artists: A vantage on artists before and two years into the pandemic
Jennifer Novak Leonard
Jennifer Novak Leonard
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), Research Associate Professor and Research Director of the Arts Impact Initiative in the College of Fine and Applied Arts; SNAAP Board Vice President & Research Director

This research examines public perceptions of artists. This study examines if public opinions of artists have changed since the start of the pandemic and provides insights on current public perceptions of artists, discussed in light of the many challenges catalyzed by the pandemic that have disproportionately impacted segments of artists and relevance to the training of arts administrators. This study utilizes cross-sectional survey data collected from over 2,000 U.S. adults in 2019 and 2022.

- EDT
Can Everyone See My Screen?: Recommendations for Arts Organizations Navigating Hybrid Digital Engagement
Michael Pritchard
Michael Pritchard
University of Kentucky, Arts Administration Doctoral Student at the University of Kentucky
Gabriela Shutt
Gabriela Shutt
Pacific Northwest Ballet, Seattle Arts Fellowship
Alaina Faulkner
Alaina Faulkner
Florida State University Libraries, Distance Library Services Assistant

Arts organizations constantly adjusted the ways they functioned digitally during the pandemic’s height. As COVID-19-related mandates evolve to allow for more in-person programming, organizations which utilized digital engagement to remain relevant must determine which aspects are most valuable. We will explore impacts of continued expanded digital engagement as organizations continue to readjust programming; and, provide recommendations for arts organizations to consider long-term. Presented by Michael Pritchard, Alaina Faulkner (Distance Library Services team at Florida State University), and Gabriela Shutt (Community Engagement Fellow at the Pacific Northwest Ballet), this work seeks to support arts organizations navigating the new hybrid frontier.

Tuesday, May 24, 2022

- EDT
Design for social change: on new practices that foster knowledge transfers from design sector elsewhere
Dr. Lyudmila Petrova
Dr. Lyudmila Petrova
CREARE Social
Cristian Campagnaro
Cristian Campagnaro
Politecnico di Torino, Associate Professor at Department of Architecture and Design

This paper first reveals the practice of design for a social change in the case study of “Costruire Bellezza”, a permanent and interdisciplinary laboratory aimed at social cohesion. The rationale of the workshops is to stimulate “beautiful heals” for the homeless through fostering their own creative potential and the experience of relationships with the others (Campagnaro, Porcellana, 2016). Second the paper discusses an interdisciplinary methodology through the integration of both Design Anthropology Approach and Value - Based Approach to capture in a systematic way the way shared values are generated and/or enhanced throughout the design activities.

- EDT
The ‘Shadow Pandemic’ of Gender-Based Violence (GBV): Activism Art Raises Awareness about GBV During a Global Crisis
Tanya Sharp (She/Her)
Tanya Sharp (She/Her)
Delinea, Principal UX Designer

Public art and activism art diverge where activism art is built on concepts of audience, relationships, communication, and political intention where public art is centered in “place” or “location” (Lacy, 1995). Historically public art is grounded on the principle that establishing art accessibility, can solve societal issues, however, public art can’t heal those affected during volatile times such as a pandemic, war, or famine (Mlambo-Ngcuka, 2020). Through the lens of personal experience, a literature review, case study analysis, interviews, and visual mapping, this project examines how public art can provide routes to new conceptions of community and provide avenues to heal.

Wednesday, May 25, 2022

- EDT
Wearing Multiple Hats: Expanding and Evolving Multiple Professional Identities in the Arts & Cultural Sector during the Covid-19 Pandemic
Jordan Campbell
Jordan Campbell
Creative Generation, Director, Research & Knowledge

Through a deep analysis of a wide range of field research on multi-hyphenate identity, this paper examines the unique difficulties and advantages faced by professionals in the arts and cultural sector who hold multiple identities simultaneously: artists who teach, independent contractors with several contract jobs, musicians who are activists, etc. Further, the ever-expanding and evolving identity of those who previously wore "one hat" will be explored, with a focus on how the pandemic has perhaps pushed them toward a multi-hyphenate identity. This paper presents the challenges and opportunities presented by Covid, and how the pandemic continues to shape multidisciplinary work in arts and culture.

- EDT
ArtPass.link
Julie Goodman
Julie Goodman
Drexel University, Associate Professor

This session explores a community-engaged project embedded in an interdisciplinary graduate course. The course supported an initial partnership and pilot project between a consortium of five mid-sized cultural organizations and a university, with the goals of expanding and sharing audiences, building inter-organizational connections, and developing a cooperative virtual reality platform. Attendees will discuss the project’s fit in arts management curricula, intersections of community-based (external to the University) and interdisciplinary (within the University) projects, the future of arts management education, and ways in which arts management education connects policy to practice.

- EDT
Graduate Research Collective as Informal Learning Pod in a Pandemic
Robin Gordon
Robin Gordon
The Ohio State University, PhD Student
Aelim Kim
Aelim Kim
The Ohio State University, PhD Student
Tamryn McDermott
Tamryn McDermott
The Ohio State University, PhD Student
Noor Murteza
Noor Murteza
The Ohio State University, PhD Student

In this session, PhD students propose the graduate research collective and annual research exhibition as opportunities for informal learning, strengthening relationships, expanding networks, and building confidence in exhibition management and participatory research practices.

Thursday, May 26, 2022

- EDT
Who and How – A European-American armchair tour of COVID, resistance and resilience.
Leonie Hodkevitch
Leonie Hodkevitch
University of Vienna/Austria, Clearly Culture, Program Director Cultural Management at University of Vienna, EU
Dee Boyle-Clapp
Dee Boyle-Clapp
University of Massachusetts Amherst, Director of the Arts Extension Service

Who stepped up during Covid? How did they do it? Who created opportunity? COVID’s waves temporarily devastated entire sectors around the globe, while nationalism and a rise in authoritarianism clashed with movements to undo racism and systemic inequities. The stories that will be remembered will be who made a positive difference.  

Join Leonie Hodkevitch, writer and University lecturer in Vienna/Austria and Thessaloniki/Greece, and Dee Boyle-Clapp, artist and docent at UMass Amherst, for a miniature European-American tour of how different locales addressed the pandemic through the role of arts in helping people cope, come together, resist, and become resilient.

- EDT
Career Impacts of the Pandemic: A Longitudinal Study
Douglas DeNatale
Douglas DeNatale
Boston University, Associate Professor of the Practice / Program Director, Boston University Arts Administration Program

Drawing from an ongoing longitudinal study of career outcomes for arts managers in Greater Boston following the Covid-19 pandemic, this paper will outline preliminary findings at a point two years from the outset of the pandemic. In collaboration with ArtsBoston, the Boston University Arts Administration Program is examining individual arts professionals' career outcomes immediately after and over the course of the region's recovery. From a large sample drawn from over 900 nonprofit arts organizations in greater Boston, the study traces the subsequent career trajectories of individual arts managers who were employed by these organizations in February 2020.

- EDT
Nonprofit Arts Education in NYC: Administrative and Financial Challenges in Government-Nonprofit Relationships
Keith E Kaminski
Keith E Kaminski
CUNY Baruch College

A large volume of arts instruction in NYC public schools is provided by arts and cultural nonprofits with funding from city agencies through grants and contracts. Using a mixed methods approach, this project collects data from nonprofit professionals to study the demographics of their organizations and their experiences with city agencies. Participants report a range of administrative and financial challenges encountered in their work and a fundamentally different understanding of the nature of the relationship compared to that of agency administrators. Specific recommendations are offered to improve collaboration, streamline and clarify administrative processes, and prioritize consistency and equity in funding.

- EDT
A Tale of Two Productions: Adapting Pedagogy for Experiential Courses
Shannon Lacek
Shannon Lacek
Drexel University, Assistant Teaching Professor

This session is a case study of two very different quarters of the same course, one fully remote synchronous and one in-person in the same year. Producing for Live Entertainment is an experience-based course designed to familiarize students with all aspects of producing a live entertainment event. But what happens when experiential courses that require extensive planning and hands on training are forced to become remote? How did students react, participate, and thrive similarly or differently in both situations? While the pandemic may end, what lessons from these pivots will inform the pedagogy of experiential learning going forward?

- EDT
Salary Disclosure in Arts Administration Job Postings
Karen Munnelly
Karen Munnelly
Florida State University, Director of Arts Administration & Assistant Professor

This presentation focuses on whether increasing discourse surrounding the link between pay transparency and salary equity has resulted in arts organizations disclosing salary information in their job postings. Data regarding whether salary was disclosed in arts administration job postings was collected over a seven-month period. Over 800 job postings were analyzed to determine if they provided details on salary. The presentation also investigates if salary disclosure has an effect on what positions arts administrators choose to apply for. The findings indicate that many arts organizations still do not provide salary information in the job description even though it is an important factor for candidates.