Environment & Energy

Wednesday, August 18, 2021

- PDT
Optimizing the Supply Chain with a Cool Link - The Cold Chain
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Manik Suri
Manik Suri
Therma, Founder & CEO

$3T of Food, Pharma, and Data are stored across the global supply chain, growing at 8% CAGR, but as recently as the 1990s, the cold chain still relied on styrofoam containers for temperature control in major products. And even today, 90% of refrigeration is “dumb” and provides no real-time monitoring or data-driven optimization. This leads to massive product waste and quality issues. How can we successfully get our products from point A to point B? What we need are smart cold chains that leverage data-driven technology to monitor products in real time to ensure quality. We are seeing a lot of novel solutions emerging around IoT sensors, tracking systems and AI technology that are adding value to the cold chain, but these technologies are still in their infancy. In this session, Manik will take us on a journey of how the cold chain may look in 2040 with these technologies. For example: AI enables fulfillment at the point of sale, Automated cold chain technology in central warehouses, Cloud integrates cold chain technologies and data for different stakeholders for full visibility and Continuing evolution of efficient transportation.

- PDT
The Tailwinds Behind EV Charging
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Jordan Ramer
Jordan Ramer
EV Connect, Chief Executive Officer

The electric vehicle (EV) is about to take over the world. By 2030, studies indicate that as many as one-third of all cars on the road will be electricity fueled. The availability of electric vehicle charging must keep pace with the growth in EVs. Charging infrastructure will rely on a combination of policy, investment, mandate, and market tailwinds to keep up with the massive growth of EVs on the road; here’s where we stand with all four. 

As it turns out, the policies supporting the electrification of transportation are still in their infancy, but smart cities and smart countries are leading the way to an electrified future. In the U.S. and Canada, the ambitious goals to reach net-zero emissions by 2050 are important forcing functions that drive ambitious policies. At the same time, ever more aggressive vehicle emissions standards in the U.S. and Europe are driving innovation in carbon credit programs and EV incentive programs for EV buyers.

Toyota, Ford, and GM, among many others, are investing tens of billions of dollars into over 160 new electric vehicle models by 2025. The amount of funding to offset the costs of installing charging stations is also growing, and increasingly available for businesses and individuals. Additionally, Biden Administration executive orders to electrify the Federal fleet of more than 600,000 vehicles also (wisely) includes the installation of 500,000 charging stations in the next decade.

A growing list of transportation mandates from cities, states and provinces, and national governments are pushing clean transportation with a focus on adding charging infrastructure, too. These mandates are changing how cities, institutions, and businesses think about their roles in the transportation sector. For example, in the last six months, the United Kingdom, the Canadian province of Quebec, and U.S. states of Washington, California, New Jersey, and Massachusetts have announced bans on the sales of new internal combustion vehicles by 2035. Earlier this year, Singapore announced it would commit to this phase-out by 2040.   

Electric vehicle and charging technology is experiencing renaissance-like advancements to the state-of-the-art, particularly in the critical domains of battery range and efficiency, all while prices are trending downwards as the industry matures. The North American EV charging infrastructure market is set to boom to $18.6 billion by 2030 — globally up to $40 billion— with an estimated 40 million charging stations projected to be deployed worldwide. As the private sector recognizes the potential of using electricity as a transportation fuel, it is responding accordingly. 

In this session, Jordan Ramer will address how these four tailwinds are pushing the monumental growth of EV charging and are propelling humanity towards a future without the scourge of tailpipe emissions.

Thursday, August 19, 2021

- PDT
Direct Air Capture: A Way Towards Net Zero?
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Daniel Egger
Daniel Egger
Climeworks, Chief Commercial Officer

Climate Scientists agree that it is not enough to just reduce CO2 emissions to stop climate change. It will be necessary to start to remove carbon dioxide from the air and store it permanently and safely. Climeworks Direct Air Capture technology removes CO2 directly from air and delivers it for underground mineralization. Direct Air Capture and Storage will be an important technology to reach net zero.

- PDT
Preventing Wildfires and CO2 Emissions with Technology
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Carsten Brinkschulte
Carsten Brinkschulte
Dryad Networks, Co-founder & CEO

Wildfires are creating up to 20% of global CO2 emissions and destroy the world's largest carbon sink and home of 3/4 of all biodiversity on earth. Since the vast majority of wildfires are human-induced, we need to look at technical solutions to prevent them.

- PDT
Circular Economy in the Construction Sector - The Intersection of Digitization and Sustainability
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Dominik Campanella
Dominik Campanella
Concular & Restado, Co-Founder

The construction sector is the largest polluter in the world. 40% of CO2 emissions are accounted to this sector. This sessions explores the opportunities which arise from solving one of the largest challenges to tackle the climate crisis. Come with us on the journey to explore opportunities on the intersection of technology, innovation and sustainability.

- PDT
Shifting Consumer Mindsets to Build a Sustainable Economy
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Matthew Hanly
Matthew Hanly
EcoFoote, CEO & Founder

In this talk I will go into the aspects of consumer mindsets and how we all need to adapt our consumption patterns to build a more sustainable economy.

- PDT
Improving Society through the Power of a Human Footstep
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Laurence Kemball-Cook
Laurence Kemball-Cook
Pavegen, Founder and CEO

Founder & CEO of Pavegen, Laurence Kemball-Cook, will talk through his vision alongside his company, to become the digital layer in future cities and improve the world through the power of a human footstep.

- PDT
Adapting to Climate Change with Solar + Water AI for the Global Food Chain
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Chris Terrell
Chris Terrell
Wexus Technologies, Co-founder and CEO

The global food supply chain is being transformed by climate change while utilities face increased client demand for affordable, reliable energy and water supplies. From growers to processors to shippers to retail, the food chain consumes 30% of global energy and 75% of global water supplies. The food industry is also grappling with severe labor shortages, aging infrastructure, stringent water regulations, unpredictable weather due to climate change, difficulty integrating renewable energy solutions, and customer demand for sustainable food supplies.

Wexus (Water-Energy Nexus) + Sweetsense is a comprehensive IoT software + hardware platform connected to the cloud via utility smart meters, billing systems and proprietary, easy-to-install IoT sensors in the field with global, low-cost microsatellite data for deployment in remote areas.

The Wexus + Sweetsense platform drives energy + drought resilience via:

• Software platform: Fully digitized company/energy/water data; continuous, automated monitoring of assets+ equipment in the field with geolocation, automated reports, real time predictive AI alerts, remote controls, efficiency tracking, upfront cost + energy savings , solar PV ROI

• Hardware platform: Global remote connectivity via microsatellites, 1/4th the cost of cellular data + 1/10th the installation time of competitors, first mover advantage by +2 years

• Bundled financing to cover equipment/infrastructure upgrades that boost topline revenue + net operating income while optimizing energy + water usage

- PDT
Virtual Power Plants
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Sarah Delisle
Sarah Delisle
Swell Energy, Senior Director of Regulatory Affairs

As climate change continues to cause more devastating extreme weather events throughout the country, there is a clear need for cleaner and more resilient power systems. Many homes and businesses have benefitted from installing rooftop solar and batteries over the past few decades, but all this clean power has also created new challenges for the electric grid. Suleman Khan, CEO of Swell Energy Inc., will discuss how aggregating distributed energy resources en masse in the form of a virtual power plant (VPP) lowers the cost of ownership for consumers and helps utilities manage demand while increasing individual reliability and resilience across the electric grid.

VPPs orchestrate thousands of solar-powered home battery systems, allowing homes to function as a single energy storage resource for the grid. When electricity demand is especially high, like during heat waves or when public safety power shut offs, a VPP can provide power without relying on fossil fuels, ensuring clean air and resiliency for the community. By enrolling in a VPP, consumers can also receive new sources of cash for supporting the local utility by taking strain off the grid during peak times with their home energy solutions. 

Fortifying the grid with residential solar power and virtual power plants reduces the need to build more fossil fuel resources, which accelerates our transition to a low-carbon economy and cleaner air. As these systems become more affordable and accessible for all homeowners, they will continue to be adopted more widely. Khan will discuss how community organizations, utilities, technology providers and other key stakeholders can work together to scale VPP deployments across the country.